Federal and state laws (should) be changed to no longer make it a crime to possess marijuana for private use. - Richard M. Nixon

Washington residents are likely to be confused about the new laws regarding medical and recreational cannabis. In 2012, voters passed Initiative 502*, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state. The Washington DOH is in the process of reforming medical cannabis regulations to fit better with the new recreational laws. The medical cannabis registration program is voluntary for patients, but it provides additional protection from law enforcement if you are arrested or charged with a cannabis-related crime (see Senate Bill 5052* for more information). Only registered marijuana patients and providers are allowed to cultivate marijuana at home, although licensed cooperative grows are still permitted (see the WA DOH website here for more information on cooperative cultivation). If you think you may qualify for a medical cannabis card in Washington, read on to understand your rights.

Washington Medical Marijuana Law

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cachexia
    HIV/AIDS
    Epilepsy
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Intractable Pain
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Hepatitis C
    Crohn’s Disease
    Nausea/Vomiting
    Cramping
    Seizures
    Wasting
    Appetite Loss
    Muscle spasms/spasticity

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    Patient – 8 ounces, a doctor may authorize up to 16 ounces of marijuana, starting July 1st, 2016, patients with a valid recognition card can purchase up to: 3 ounces of useable marijuana, 48 ounces of marijuana-infused products, 216 ounces of marijuana-infused products in liquid form or 21 grams of marijuana concentrates. Recreational – 1 ounce of useable marijuana, 16 ounces of marijuana-infused edibles, 72 ounces of marijuana in liquid form, 7 grams of marijuana concentrates

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes, both

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Senate Bill 5052*
    Initiative 502*
    WA Uniform Controlled Substances Act*

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, called providers in Washington

Washington Medical Marijuana Card

 

 

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Washington

Washington medical marijuana cards are called recognition cards. Applying for a recognition card is voluntary and provides extra protection from law enforcement. When you apply for a recognition card, you will be entered into the state medical cannabis database, which allows you to purchase up to three ounces of marijuana at a time from retailers and dispensaries. Starting July 1st, 2016, patients who have a recognition card will not need to pay taxes on marijuana purchased from retailers. If you do not wish to be entered into the database, a completed and signed Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* may provide you with an affirmative defense in court if you are arrested or charged with a cannabis-related crime. Read Senate Bill 5052* for more information.

  1. Have your doctor fill out a Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form*. This form must be printed on tamper-resistant paper.
  2. Read and sign page the patient/designated provider section of the same form.
    • If the patient is a minor, the parent/legal guardian must fill out and sign this section of the form.
    • The parent or legal guardian of a minor patient must obtain a second Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* and submit it to become the designated provider of the minor patient.
  3. Your doctor must fill out and sign a second form if you choose to designate a provider. Give the second form to your provider to complete the patient/designated provider section before mailing the forms.
  4. There is no fee to register for a medical marijuana card in Washington.
  5. Mail this form to:Medical Marijuana Program
    P.O. Box 47852
    Olympia, WA 98504-7852
  6. Once your application is approved, you will be entered into the state medical cannabis database and receive a recognition card in the mail.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Washington

Washington state does not allow recreational users to grow marijuana. Registered medical cannabis patients and their providers may cultivate up to 6 plants at home or up to 15 plants with a doctor’s authorization. Patients who choose not to register may have an affirmative defense in court if they have a Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* from their doctor. Patients who are unregistered may not cultivate more than 4 plants at home. Currently, cannabis can be purchased from retail stores by both patients and recreational users. Registered patients can also use medical marijuana dispensaries until July 1st, 2016. Starting in July of 2016, only licensed retail stores will be permitted to sell marijuana. See the section on Marijuana Laws above for more details on purchase and possession limits for both medical cannabis patients and recreational users. Starting in July of 2016, patients who possess a recognition card will not be required to pay taxes on marijuana purchased from retail stores. Cooperative cultivation is still allowed by registered patients and providers, however, starting in 2016, cooperative grows will have to be licensed by the Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB). See the Washington DOH website here for more information.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Washington

Medical marijuana providers in Washington can register for a recognition card by obtaining a Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* from their patient’s doctor and mailing it to:

Medical Marijuana Program
P.O. Box 47852
Olympia, WA 98504-7852

Patients and providers must have two separate forms, both completed and signed by the patient’s physician. Possession of this form alone does not provide medical cannabis providers with an affirmative defense in court if they are arrested or charged with a cannabis-related crime. Only registered patients can use the Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* as an affirmative defense in court. See Senate Bill 5052* for more information.

A provider is permitted to have only one patient at a time, but a medical cannabis patient can register to be a provider for one patient other than himself/herself.

How to Renew Your Washington Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Washington state recognition cards for adults are good for one year or until the date printed on the card. Recognition cards for patients under 18 are good for six months or until the date listed on the card. Renew your registration by obtaining a new Washington State Medical Marijuana Authorization Form* from your doctor and mailing it to the address listed above.

Washington Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Provider registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You are currently a registered provider for any other patients

Forms and Resources

Washington

Status: Active

 

Law Signed: 2012

Oregon residents can celebrate the implementation of their state’s new recreational marijuana law. Starting on July 1st, 2015, adults over 21 can officially possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana in public and up to 8 ounces of marijuana in their homes. Also, each household is permitted to grow up to four cannabis plants, although individuals are not allowed to sell marijuana without government approval. Unlike other states that have legalized recreational marijuana, Oregon’s law does not limit sales to state dispensaries, but businesses and retail stores do need a license to sell cannabis. Oregon expects to start issuing business licenses in early 2016. Adults over 21 who are currently medical marijuana patients do not need to renew their registration to possess and cultivate cannabis. Minors and adults under 21, however, do need to continue applying for registration until they are old enough to purchase the drug legally.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    HIV/AIDS
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Cachexia
    Severe Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent muscle spasms

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    With Registry Identification Card 24 ounces and 6 mature plants per household. Without an RIC recreational use is 8 ounces at home or 1 ounce in public and 4 mature plants per household.

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 plants or 4 plant recreational.

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Oregon Medical Marijuana Act*
    Ch. 475 Oregon Controlled Substances*

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, parent or legal guardian must register if the patient is under 18

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Oregon

  1. Download and print the OMMP Application Packet*.
  2. Download and read the OMMP Application Handbook*.
  3. Have your doctor fill out the Attending Physicians’ Statement included in your Application Packet*. You must submit your application within 90 days of the date your doctor signed this form.
  4. Fill out the form and sign. If you are designating a caregiver or grower, fill out the caregiver/grower sections of the form. If you are growing your own marijuana, fill out the grower section with your own information.
    • If the patient is a minor, a parent/legal guardian must fill out the Declaration of Person Responsible for a Minor to Participate in Oregon Medical Marijuana Program* form.
  5. Make a copy of your state or federally issued ID. If you have designated a caregiver or grower on the form, you must include a copy of their ID as well. See the OMMP Application Handbook* for acceptable forms of photo ID.
  6. Include a check or money order for the appropriate fee. Patient registration is $200. An additional fee of $50 is required if you choose to designate a grower other than yourself. You may qualify for a reduced fee if you are currently accepting government assistance. See the OMMP Application Packet* for more information.
  7. Mail all of the above documents to:OHA/OMMP
    PO Box 14450
    Portland, OR 97293-0450
  8. If your application is approved, your OMMP Card will be mailed to you within 30 days.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Oregon

Oregon allows medical marijuana patients to use both state dispensaries and home cultivation to acquire marijuana. If you choose to use state dispensaries to purchase marijuana, you need to present your OMMP Card and a government issued photo ID before cannabis will be sold to you.

If you choose to cultivate marijuana at home, Oregon law allows adults over 21 to grow up to four plants (mature or immature) without registration. If you choose to register a grower or grow site, you may grow up to 6 mature plants at a time and 18 seedlings. If you designate a grower other than yourself, an additional fee of $50 is required with your application. Growers are permitted to cultivate cannabis for up to four patients at a time. All plants, seedlings and materials associated with growing cannabis are the property of the patient, not the grower.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Oregon

Caregivers and growers are not the same in Oregon. A caregiver in Oregon is responsible for acquiring, delivering and assisting the patient with medical marijuana. A grower is responsible for cultivating marijuana. You can be both a grower and a caregiver in Oregon, but make sure to fill out both sections of the patient application. If the patient is under 18, a parent or legal guardian must register as the child’s caregiver.

To become a grower or caregiver, you must submit a copy of your photo ID with your patient’s application and fill out the section for growers/caregivers on the form. If the patient has already submitted his/her application, a Change Form* must be submitted to designate a grower/caregiver. The fee to submit a Change Form* is $100.  

How to Renew Your Oregon Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

When it is time to renew your OMMP Card, you will receive a renewal packet in the mail containing all the necessary forms and instructions. Follow these instructions to resubmit your application and renew your card.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Grower Registration is not available if you are:

  • Under 18 years old
  • Currently growing for 4 OMMP Patients
  • You have been convicted of a drug-related felony in the last 5 years
  • You have more than one drug-related felony conviction since 2006.

Caregiver Registration is not available if you are:

  • Under 18 years old

Oregon

Status: Active

Law Signed: 1998

In 1996, California became the first state in America to allow medical marijuana use for qualifying patients. Unlike other states, a Medical Marijuana Identification Card (MMIC) is voluntary and not required in order to use or acquire medical cannabis. However, you must still have the recommendation of a California state licensed physician to legally use pot. If you have an MMIC card, law enforcement officials can check your registration number against the state database and will not arrest you or confiscate your marijuana (up to 8 ounces) if your registration is valid. If you choose not to register, you should carry your physician’s paperwork with you and present it to law enforcement officials if you are caught carrying marijuana. A physician’s recommendation alone will not always prevent arrest for possession or confiscation of medical pot, but the Compassionate Use Act* entitles you to an affirmative defense in court should you be charged with a crime.

California works very hard to protect the identity and personal information of medical cannabis patients. The MMIC database does not contain any of the patients’ personal information, only their registry ID number and the status of their registration (valid or invalid). For this reason, patients and caregivers are required to resubmit all paperwork annually for a new card and registration number. Senate Bill 420* outlines the legal restrictions for medical marijuana patients and caregivers. A patient is not required to designate a caregiver in California, and some counties have non-profit state dispensaries available for patients who do not want to grow their own pot. Each county has different regulations regarding patient applications, caregivers and dispensaries, so if you qualify for medical marijuana in California, make sure to check with your county program before applying for an MMIC.

In California, unlawful personal use or possession of 28.5 grams or less of marijuana is a infraction punishable by a fine of up to $100. Possession of more than 28.5 grams is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 6 months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $500. Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to sell or distribute is a felony punishable by 2-4 years imprisonment. Different penalties may apply for minors or individuals caught cultivating or concentrating marijuana. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to eight ounces(or more if medically necessary)  of cannabis. Read the California Compassionate Care Act* or Senate Bill 420*for more information

California Medical Marijuana Law

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    8 ounces, or any amount reasonably related to current medical needs

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 mature plants and 12 seedlings per patient, or an amount of marijuana consistent with the patients needs.

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes, but only in certain counties. All dispensaries must be non-profit cooperatives or collectives.

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in California

(MMIC Registration is voluntary for patients in California)

  1. Print and fill out the Medical Marijuana Program Application/Renewal* form.
  2. Have a physician licensed in the state of California fill out the Written Documentation of Patient’s Medical Records*. This is not a required form. Any documentation from your doctor that recommends marijuana as a treatment for a qualifying illness is acceptable. Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  3. You must provide proof of identity at the county office when you apply. A valid California Driver’s License, State ID or any other government-issued photo ID is acceptable as proof if identity.
  4. You must also provide proof of residency in the form of a rent or mortgage agreement, a utility bill or motor vehicle registration.
  5. For minors:
    • Minors follow the same procedure for application as adults, but a legal parent or guardian must be contacted to verify the application.
    • A certified copy of the patient’s birth certificate will serve as proof of identity if no government ID is available.
    • Check with your county about any additional paperwork or requirements. Some counties may have further restrictions for minors.
  6. You must apply in person at your county’s program office. You will need to give them your proof of identity, proof of residency and completed Application/Renewal form. They will process your application and take a photograph for your Medical Marijuana Identification Card.
  7. A fee will be charged to process your application. Fees vary by county, so check with your county program prior to applying. If you are a Medi-Cal beneficiary, you qualify for a 50% discount on your application fee.
  8. It may take up to 35 days for your county to process the application. If approved, you will receive your card by mail.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in California

State licensed dispensaries are allowed in California but only in certain counties. All dispensaries must be non-profit cooperatives or collectives. Home cultivation is also allowed with up to 6 mature plants and 12 seedlings per patient, or “an amount of marijuana consistent with the patient’s needs”. Please refer to Guidelines For The Security and Non-Diversion of Marijuana Grown for Medical Use* for further restrictions on home cultivation.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in California

Unlike other states, caregivers in California cannot apply directly for an MMIC. A patient must apply on their behalf. A caregiver may have more than one patient, but only if all the patients and the caregiver live within the same county. When you apply to be a caregiver, follow the same steps listed above for patients, but fill out the sections of the Application/Renewal form designated for caregivers. Have your patient fill out the portion for Applicants. Patients and caregivers are required to submit their applications to the county program together. Minors are permitted to be caregivers under certain circumstances. Check with your county program for more information.

How to Renew Your California Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Simply follow the same steps and procedures as your initial registration.

California Medical Marijuana Restrictions

If  a patient or caregiver meets all of the criteria for application, the state of California does not have any further restrictions. No background check or criminal history needs to be provided.

California

Status: Active

Law Signed: 1996

Nevada natives may find themselves confused about how to obtain Medical Marijuana. Medical cannabis has been legal in Nevada since 2001. Originally, state dispensaries were not available to patients, so the only way to obtain cannabis was by cultivating it or purchasing it from a caregiver. In 2013, Governor Brian Sandoval signed Senate Bill 374* into law, which requires the state to establish dispensaries. The new dispensary system is meant to replace home cultivation by April of 2016. Patients with qualifying conditions need to register with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to obtain a Registry ID Card and purchase marijuana. If you live in Nevada and think you may qualify for a Medical Marijuana card, read on to understand your rights.

In Nevada, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $600. A second offense is punishable by a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of more than one ounce but less than 100lbs of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by 1-5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $5,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. Read Medical Use of Marijuana Chapter 453A* for more information.

Nevada Medical Marijuana Law

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    AIDS
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Sever Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2.5 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 12 plants until July 1st, 2016

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Medical Use of Marijuana- Chapter 453A
    Senate Bill 374* (2013)

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

Nevada Medical Marijuana Card

The state of Nevada does allow patients with qualifying medical conditions to apply for a Medical Cannabis card. This gives them the right to obtain and use marijuana without any nasty legal consequences. We’ve outlined the steps to acquiring a card below. Medical marijuana cards are good for one year or until the expiration date listed on the card. Nevada does allow state dispensaries and is in the process of creating a dispensary system that will eliminate the need for home cultivation.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Nevada

  1. Before you can apply for a Nevada Medical Marijuana Card, you must purchase an Application packet by filling out a Medical Marijuana Registry Request Form* and mailing it along with a $25 check or money order made out to Division of Public and Behavioral Health to:
    Division of Public and Behavioral Health
    Attn: MMR
    4150 Technology Way Suite 104
    Carson City NV 89706
  2. When you receive your application packet, you must complete all the forms including:
    • Application Statement
    • Attending Physician’s Statement- this form must be filled out by a licensed physician in the state of Nevada.
    • Waiver and Acknowledgement- These forms must be notarized.
    • Caregiver Application (if you choose a caregiver).
    • Minor Release Form- Must be filled out if applicant is under 18. This form must be notarized. A parent or legal guardian must register as the minor’s caregiver.
    • Proof of residency- A copy of your Nevada Driver’s License or State ID.
  3. Include a check or money order for $75 made out to Division of Public and Behavioral Health.
  4. Mail your completed packet and check or money order to:
    Division of Public and Behavioral Health
    Attn: MMR
    4150 Technology Way Suite 104
    Carson City NV 89706
  5. Once your application is accepted and deemed complete, you will receive a 30-day temporary acceptance letter. Nevada will conduct a criminal background check. If you pass the criminal background check, you will receive an approval letter. Take this approval letter to a Nevada DMV office. The DMV will issue you a Registry Photo ID card for a fee of $11. This card is required to obtain and use medical marijuana.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Nevada

Nevada is in the process of switching over to a state dispensary system. If you are a patient or caregiver who was cultivating marijuana legally prior to July 1st, 2013, you can continue to do so until March 31st, 2016. If you were not cultivating marijuana prior to July 1st, 2013, you must acquire your medical cannabis from a state dispensary. Patients and caregivers who are currently cultivating marijuana must stop doing so on or before March 31st, 2016.  State dispensaries require you to provide your Registry Photo ID in order to purchase cannabis.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Nevada

If you would like to become a medical marijuana caregiver in Nevada, all you need to do is fill out the Caregiver Application included in your patient’s application packet. Make sure that your patient fills out the Caregiver Application section of the Medical Marijuana Registry Request Form*. If he/she fails to do so, the caregiver application will not be included is his/her application packet. You will need to provide a copy of your Nevada Driver’s License or State ID. There is no additional fee to apply as a caregiver, however, if you pass a Nevada criminal background check, you will receive a letter of approval which must be taken to a Nevada DMV office. The DMV will issue you a Registry ID Card for a fee of $11. New caregivers in Nevada are not permitted to cultivate cannabis. Each patient is allowed to have only one caregiver and each caregiver can assist only one patient. Caregivers cannot also be patients.

How to Renew Your Nevada Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Registry ID Cards in Nevada expire after one year or the date listed on the card. Renewal applications are submitted just like new applications. Follow the steps above to renew your Nevada Registry ID Card.

Nevada Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years old
  • You are the patient’s physician
  • You have ever been convicted of selling a controlled substance
  • You are currently a registered medical marijuana patient

Patient registration is not available if:

  • You have ever been convicted of selling a controlled substance

Forms and Resources

Nevada

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2001

Arizona Residents are fortunate enough to have access to medical marijuana. In 2010, voters passed Proposition 203*, which allows individuals with qualifying conditions to register as medical marijuana patients. Arizona is also one the few states in America that allows the operation of nonprofit state cannabis dispensaries. The process of becoming a registered patient or caregiver in Arizona is complicated, but very worthwhile for those suffering from debilitating illnesses. If you live in Arizona and you think you may qualify for medical marijuana registration, read on to understand your rights.

In Arizona, unlawful personal use or possession of 2 pounds or less of marijuana may be a misdemeanor or felony punishable by up to 1.5 years in jail and a fine of $750-150,000. Possession of 2-4 pounds of Marijuana is punishable by up to 2 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $150,000. Possession of more than 4 pounds is punishable by the same fine and a maximum of 3 years imprisonment. Any offense committed near a school or bus is an automatic felony with an additional $2,000 in fines. Possession with intent to sell is a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $150,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. Read the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act* for more information.

** Links to full legal documents can be found in our Legal Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Arizona Medical Marijuana Law

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS
    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD
  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    Patients and caregivers may obtain up to 2.5 ounces every 14 days from a state-registered nonprofit dispensary

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, but only if the patient lives over 25 miles from a dispensary and the patient or caregiver may have up to 12 plants in an enclosed, locked facility

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES
    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**
  •   CAREGIVERS
    Yes, Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Arizona

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Arizona (Adults)

  1. Visit the Arizona Department of Health Services* website and review the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Checklist*and Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Application Information* form.
  2. Have a physician licensed in the state of Arizona fill out a Medical Marijuana Physician Certification Form*. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application. Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  3. Fill out the Medical Marijuana Patient Attestation Form*. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application.
  4. Obtain a digital copy of a current 2X2 inch photograph (maximum 60 days old). See the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  5. Scan your Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport onto your computer. This copy must be uploaded during the online application process.
  6. If you are currently participating in the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), scan this documentation as well.
  7. Make sure you have the following documents in the appropriate digital formats (PDF, JPG, GIF or PNG) on your computer:
    • A completed copy of the Medical Marijuana Physician Certification Form*
    • A completed copy of the Marijuana Patient Attestation Form*
    • A current 2X2 inch photograph of yourself (See the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements)
    • A copy of your Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport
    • Copies of your SNAP documentation (if applicable)
    • Caregiver information if you are designating a caregiver (see section on caregivers below)
  8. Fill out the Qualifying Patient New Application* online. You will upload the required documentation at the end of your application.
  9. Pay for your application with a Visa or Mastercard (credit or debit is fine). The cost to apply is $150. If you are currently receiving SNAP government assistance, you may qualify for a reduced fee of $75.
    When you have completed and paid for your application, make sure to print a copy for your records. ADHS will review your application and send you an automated e-mail for your approval. If there are any problems with your  application, you will be notified with instructions on how to correct them and resubmit.
  10. If your application is approved, your Registry Identification Card will be mailed   to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Arizona (Minors)

  1. Visit the Arizona Department of Health Services* website and review the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Under the Age of 18 Checklist* and the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Under the Age of 18 Instruction* form.
  2. Have a physician licensed in the state of Arizona fill out a Medical Marijuana Physician Certification Form*. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application. Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  3. Have a second physician licensed in the state of Arizona fill out the Medical Marijuana Reviewing Physician Certification for Patients Under 18* form. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application. Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  4. Fill out the Medical Marijuana Custodial Parent and Legal Guardian Attestation Form*. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application.
  5. Arizona requires that a parent or guardian for any patient under 18 register as the patient’s caregiver. The patient and caregiver will both apply using the same online application.
  6. Obtain a digital 2X2 inch copy of the caregiver’s current photograph AND a digital 2X2 inch copy of the patient’s current photograph (maximum 60 days old). See the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Under the Age of 18 Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  7. Scan the caregiver’s Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport onto your computer. This copy must be uploaded during the online application process.
  8. If the patient is currently participating in the USDA Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), scan this documentation as well.
  9. Make sure you have the following documents in the appropriate digital formats (PDF, JPG, GIF or PNG) on your computer:
    • A completed copy of the Medical Marijuana Physician Certification Form*
    • A completed copy of the Medical Marijuana Reviewing Physician Certification for Patients Under 18form*
    • A completed copy of the Medical Marijuana Custodial Parent and Legal Guardian Attestation Form*
    • A current 2X2 inch photograph of the patient (See the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Under the Age of 18 Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements)
    • A current 2X2 inch photograph of the caregiver (See the Medical Marijuana Program Qualifying Patient Under the Age of 18 Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements)
    • A copy of the caregiver’s Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport
    • Copies of SNAP documentation (if applicable)
    • Copies of Proof of Guardianship documentation (if applicable)
  10. Fill out the Minor Qualifying Patient New Application* online. You will upload the required documentation at the end of your application.
  11. Pay for your application with a Visa or Mastercard (credit or debit is fine). You will need to pay the $150 fee for patient registration and the $200 fee for caregiver registration. If the patient is currently receiving SNAP government assistance, the fee for patient registration may be reduced to $75.
  12. At the end of your application, you will be redirected to the Fingerprint Submission Information page. Print this page- it will be mailed together with your completed fingerprints to the ADHS.
  13. When you have completed and paid for your application, make sure to print a copy for your records. ADHS will review your application and send you an automated e-mail for your approval. If there are any problems with your application, you will be notified with instructions on how to correct them and resubmit.
  14. Print the Fingerprinting Instructions form* and the Fingerprint Verification Form* from the ADHS website.
  15. Contact your local law enforcement agency or a private fingerprinting company to schedule a fingerprinting appointment. You will need to have your fingerprints taken in person.
  16. Make sure that the fingerprinting technician follows the instructions on the Fingerprint Verification Form* by properly sealing the envelope and signing his/her name across the seal. The signed envelope should include:
    • A copy of the Fingerprint Submission Information Page from your online application
    • The Fingerprint Verification Form*
    • TWO sets of original fingerprints
  17. Mail the envelope to:Arizona Department of Health Services
    P.O. Box 19000
    Phoenix, AZ 85005
  18. If your application is approved, your Registry Identification Card will be mailed to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Arizona

In Arizona, nonprofit state dispensaries are available for medical marijuana patients. If you live within 25 miles of a dispensary, you are not allowed to grow marijuana for yourself. The 25 mile regulation is based on the location of the patient, not the caregiver. Registered caregivers are allowed to acquire marijuana for patients within this range, but only from a registered state dispensary. If patients live more than 25 miles from a state dispensary, a caregiver can grow up to 12 marijuana plants (per patient) in an enclosed, locked facility. A caregiver may have up to 5 qualifying patients at any given time. Patients are permitted to be caregivers as well. Caregivers are not allowed to accept money from patients beyond the actual cost of growing or obtaining medical cannabis.

When you visit a state dispensary in Arizona, you will be required to present your Registration Card before purchasing cannabis. Registered patients and caregivers are allowed to purchase up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana within a 14-day period.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Arizona

  1. Visit the Arizona Department of Health Services* website and review the Medical Marijuana Program Designated Caregiver Application Information Form* and the Medical Marijuana Program Designated Caregiver Application Checklist*.
  2. Fill out the Medical Marijuana Caregiver Attestation* form. This form must be scanned to your computer and uploaded for the online application.
  3. Obtain a digital 2X2 inch copy of the your current photograph (maximum 60 days old). See the Medical Marijuana Program Designated Caregiver Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  4. Scan your Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport onto your computer. This copy must be uploaded during the online application process.
  5. Make sure you have the following documents in the appropriate digital formats (PDF, JPG, GIF or PNG) on your computer:
    • A completed copy of the Medical Marijuana Caregiver Attestation Form*
    • A current 2X2 inch photograph of yourself (See the Medical Marijuana Program Designated Caregiver Application Checklist* for more details on file type and image requirements)
    • A copy of the your Arizona Driver’s License, Arizona State ID card, Arizona Registry card or US passport
  6. Fill out the Designated Caregiver New Application* online. You will upload the required documentation at the end of your application.
  7. Pay for your application with a Visa or Mastercard (credit or debit is fine). The cost to apply is $200.
  8. At the end of your application, you will be redirected to the Fingerprint Submission Information page. Print this page- it will be mailed together with your completed fingerprints to the ADHS.
  9. When you have completed and paid for your application, make sure to print a copy for your records. ADHS will review your application and send you an automated e-mail for your approval. If there are any problems with your application, you will be notified with instructions on how to correct them and resubmit.
  10. Print the Fingerprinting Instructions form* and the Fingerprint Verification Form* from the ADHS website.
  11. Contact your local law enforcement agency or a private fingerprinting company to schedule a fingerprinting appointment. You will need to have your fingerprints taken in person.
  12. Make sure that the fingerprinting technician follows the instructions on the Fingerprint Verification Form* by properly sealing the envelope and signing his/her name across the seal. The signed envelope should include:
    • A copy of the Fingerprint Submission Information Page from your online application
    • The Fingerprint Verification Form*
    • TWO sets of original fingerprints
  13. Mail the envelope to:Arizona Department of Health Services
    P.O. Box 19000
    Phoenix, AZ 85005
  14. If your application is approved, your Registry Identification Card will be mailed to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

How to Renew Your Arizona Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

In Arizona, registration for both patients and caregivers must be renewed annually. The cost of re-application for a patient is $150. The caregiver re-application cost is $200. All documentation must be resubmitted in the same manner as the original application with these exceptions:

  • You must submit your renewal at least 90 days in advance of the expiration date on your registration card. If you fail to do so, you must resubmit as a new patient/caregiver.
  • You only need to resubmit a copy of your Driver’s License, Sate ID, Passport or Registry card if your name has changed.
  • Instead of filling out the New Patient Application or New Caregiver Application, select the Renewal Application option when you apply online.You must obtain new copies of your photograph, Physician’s Certification Form(s), Patient/Parent/Caregiver Attestation and fingerprints. Arizona requires that patients and caregivers who are associated with one another each renew annually. If a patient or caregiver fails to resubmit, the associated patient/caregiver’s registration will be invalidated. Failure to renew at least 90 days prior to the expiration date on your card will result in invalidation of your registration and require a new application for both patient and caregiver.

Arizona Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver Registration is not available if you:

  • Are under 21 years of age
  • Have ever been convicted of an excluded felony offense (see the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act* for a list of excluded Felonies)

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Arizona

Status: Active
Law Signed: 2010

Utah residents do not currently have access to any form of medical cannabis. In 2015, Senator Mark B Madsen proposed Senate Bill 259*, which would have legalized the use of  cannabis for patients suffering from a variety of qualifying illnesses. Unfortunately, the bill failed when the Utah Senate voted 14-15 against it on March 9th, 2015. Almost half of the states in America have already legalized medical marijuana, and recreational marijuana has begun to make an impact as well. Allowing cannabis to be used for medical treatment also allows doors to open for medical research and pharmacology.

If you live in Utah and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, keep your eyes open for legislation in 2016 and let your state representatives know how you feel. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Utah, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of 1 ounce to 1 pound of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by 1 year in prison and fines of up to $2,500. Possession of 1 to 100 pounds is a felony worth 5 years in prison and fines of up to $5,000. Unlawful possession of more than 100 pounds of cannabis is a felony worth up to 15 years imprisonment and fines of up to $10,000. Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a felony worth up to 5 years in prison and fines of $5,000. Read Utah Code, Title 58 and Title 76* for more information.

Utah

Status: Inactive

In New Mexico, patients with qualifying medical conditions have the opportunity to apply for a medical cannabis card. In 2007, The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act* was passed, which decriminalizes marijuana possession for registered patients. The law allows patients and caregivers to possess up to 6 ounces of marijuana. It also allows patients to grow up to 4 mature plants and 12 seedlings if they apply for a Personal Production License. Unlike other states, caregivers in New Mexico are not allowed to grow marijuana for their patients, however, the state does have an established dispensary system for medical cannabis. We’ve listed the laws and regulations below and outlined the steps to getting your medical marijuana card.

In New Mexico, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 15 days in jail and a maximum fine of $100. A second offense is punishable by up to 1 year in prison and/or a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of 1-8 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 1 year imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of any amount over 8 ounces or intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 18 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $15,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to six ounces of cannabis. Read the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    ALS
    Cancer
    Crohn’s Disease
    Epilepsy
    Glaucoma
    Hepatitis C
    HIV/AIDS
    Huntington’s Disease
    Hospice Care
    Inclusion Body Myositis
    Inflammatory autoimmune‐mediated arthritis
    Intractable Nausea/Vomiting
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord
    Painful Peripheral Neuropathy
    Parkinson’s disease
    PTSD
    Severe Chronic Pain
    Severe Anorexia/Cachexia
    Spasmodic Torticollis
    Ulcerative Colitis

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    6 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 4 mature plants and 12 seedlings

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Lynn and Eric Compassionate Use Act*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in New Mexico

  1. Download and print the Medical Cannabis Patient Application* from the New Mexico Department of Health website.
  2. Fill out the Enrollment/Re-Enrollment Information Form included in the application.
  3. Have your physician fill out the Enrollment/Re-Enrollment Medical Certification Form and the Medical Provider Clinical Diagnostic Notes Form (both included in the application).
  4. Fill out and sign the Release of Information Form included in the application.
  5. Make a copy of your New Mexico Driver’s License or State ID.
  6. Mail all of the above documents to:Department of Health
    Medical Cannabis Program
    1190 St. Francis Drive, Suite S3400
    Santa Fe, NM 87505

    There is no enrollment fee for the medical cannabis program in New Mexico.

  7. You should receive your card in the mail within 40 days.
  8. If you choose to grow your own marijuana or designate a caregiver, please see the sections on home cultivation and caregivers below. Minors are permitted to apply for medical cannabis, but a parent or legal guardian must apply as their caregiver.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in New Mexico

New Mexico does allow licensed nonprofit dispensaries for medical cannabis patients. A patient can purchase marijuana from any of these dispensaries if he/she has a valid registry ID card. Patients and caregivers with registry ID cards can legally possess up to 6 ounces of marijuana. You will receive a list of Licensed Nonprofit Producers when you receive your card.

Patients are also permitted to grow marijuana if they choose to. Before a patient can cultivate marijuana, he/she must apply for a Personal Production License*. Each patient is permitted to have up to 4 mature plants and 12 seedlings at any given time. All plants must be cultivated on the patient’s property. Caregivers are not allowed to cultivate marijuana-only to assist patients with cultivation. We’ve explained how to apply for a Personal Production License below.

  1. Download and print the Personal Production License Application*.
  2. Fill out the application and make sure to fully answer all questions. Provide as many details as possible about the location and security of your grow site. Photographs and maps are welcome.
  3. Include a utility bill, lease agreement or property tax record as proof of residency.
  4. If you are renting or leasing your property, you must include a written permission statement from the property owner to grow cannabis.
  5. The fee to apply for a PPL is $30 unless you can provide proof that your household makes less than 200% of the federal poverty guidelines. If you provide proof of financial hardship, the license fee will be waived.  Include a check or money order for $30 or copies of your most recent tax return.
  6. Mail all of the above documents to:NM Dept. of Health/MCP
    1190 St. Francis Dr. Suite S 3400
    Santa Fe, NM 87505
  7. It may take up to 30 days for your application to be processed. If you mail your Patient Application at the same time, your PPL application will not be processed until your Patient Application is approved. Allow up to 60 days for a response if both applications are mailed at the same time. Your Personal Production License will expire on the same day that your registry ID card expires. Make sure to resubmit all forms for renewal before your license expires.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in New Mexico

Caregivers in New Mexico are not permitted to grow marijuana in their homes. They are permitted to grow marijuana at their patients’ homes if their patient has a Personal Production License. The caregiver is primarily responsible for assisting the patient with acquiring and administering marijuana. Once your application is approved, your registry ID card will be mailed to you. Here are the steps to becoming a medical marijuana caregiver in New Mexico:

  1. Download and print the Caregiver Application* from the New Mexico Department of Health website.
  2. Fill out the Caregiver Application*. You will need the patient’s signature as well as the caregiver’s signature.
  3. Have the patient’s physician fill out the Certifying Medical Provider section of the application and sign.
  4. Have the patient fill out the Release of Medical Information to Caregiver Form (this is included in the Caregiver Application*).
  5. If the patient is a minor, the parent or guardian must also fill out the New Mexico Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program Qualified Minor Parental Consent Form (included in the Caregiver Application*).
  6. All caregivers are required to have a criminal background check done before they can apply. Visit any National Criminal Background Check company and have the results mailed to your address. Include a copy of the results with your application when you mail it.
  7. Include a copy of your New Mexico Driver’s License or State ID.
  8. There is no application fee for caregivers. Mail all of the above documents to:Medical Cannabis Program
    New Mexico Department of Health
    1190 St. Francis Drive, S3400
    PO Box 26110
    Santa Fe, NM 87502-6110
  9. You should receive your registry ID card in the mail within 40 days of mailing your application.

How to Renew Your New Mexico Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Patient and caregiver registration expires one year after the date it is issued. You must re-apply by repeating the steps above at least 30 days prior to the expiration date on your card. Make sure to check the box labeled Re-Enrollment and enter your registry ID number on the form.

New Mexico Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years of age
  • You have ever been convicted of a drug related felony

Forms and Resources

New Mexico

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2007

Sadly, Texas does not allow residents to use cannabis for medical purposes. On June 1st, 2015, however, Governor Abbott signed Senate Bill 339* into law, which allows doctors to prescribe low-THC cannabis and cannabis-infused products to patients with intractable epilepsy. The bill does not make provisions for acquiring or cultivating marijuana- growing or selling marijuana is still illegal in Texas. There is some concern that the text of the bill is ineffective, because doctors are not permitted to prescribe marijuana under federal law, they are only allowed to recommend it.

If you live in Texas and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Texas, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 days in prison and a fine of up to $2,000. Possession of 2-4 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by 1 year in prison and fines of up to $4,000. Possession of 4 ounces to 5 pounds is a felony worth 2 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000. Unlawful possession of 5-2,000 pounds of cannabis is a felony worth up to 20 years imprisonment and fines of up to $10,000. Sale or distribution of 7 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by 1 year in prison and/or a fine of up to $4,000. Sale or distribution of more than 7 grams but less than 5 pounds is a felony worth up to 2 years in prison and fines of $10,000. Sale or distribution of more than 5 pounds of cannabis is punishable by up to 99 years in prison and fines of up to $100,000 (depending on the amount). Read Texas Penal Code Title 3* for more information.

Texas

Status: Inactive

Oklahoma is taking small steps toward legalizing medical marijuana. On April 30th, 2015, Governor Mary Fallin signed “Katie’s Law” (House Bill 2154*). The new law allows patients with severe epilepsy to obtain and use cannabidiol (CBD) as a part of a clinical trial or expanded-access program. Oklahoma does not have a system in place for producing CBD or providing it to patients who are eligible under the new law. Unfortunately, Oklahoma does not seem ready to legalize marijuana in its plant form or to give a larger number of patients access to the drug.

If you live in Oklahoma and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, take a look at the Oklahoma Compassionate Care Program here.  You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Oklahoma, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is punishable by up to 1 year in prison. A second offense is a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. Sale or distribution of less than 25 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 2 years to life in prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000. Sale or distribution of more than 25 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 4 years to life in prison and fines of up to $500,000. Read Oklahoma Title 63* for more information.

Oklahoma

Status: Inactive

In 2012, Colorado residents voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. The new law is loaded with regulations regarding the testing, taxation and distribution of marijuana, but adults over the age of 21 are now legally allowed to possess up to 1 ounce of pot or 6 plants, with a maximum of 3 in the flowering stage. Medical marijuana patients are not required to register with the state. However, many patients in Colorado are still doing so, because the tax rate on medical cannabis is only 2.9%, significantly lower than the 27.9%  tax on recreational weed.

Colorado passed their Medical Marijuana Act in 2000, long before recreational cannabis was even a possibility. Now that adults are permitted to use and carry pot, the old medical marijuana laws are being re-worked to better fit the new system. Lawmakers are still debating the changes that need to be made for caregivers, but in May of 2015, Senate Bill 14* was passed and some general rules have been enacted. Medical marijuana patients with a registry card or a written physician’s recommendation can carry up to 2 ounces of marijuana. Caregivers are permitted to grow up to 6 plants per patient, with a maximum of 99 plants total.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    HIV/AIDS
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Severe Pain
    Glaucoma
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 plants with a maximum of 3 mature plants

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Colorado Constitution Article XVIII*(2000)
    Senate Bill 109* (2010)
    House Bill 1284* (2010)
    Senate Bill 14* (2015)

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes.
    Due to the changes in laws regarding recreational marijuana, the Marijuana Enforcement Division (MEA) is changing and updating regulations for caregivers. We do not yet know what these changes will include, but they will be fully implemented in 2017.

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Colorado

  1. Obtain and fill out the Application for Registration Card* or Medical Marijuana Registry Card Application for Patients Under 18 Years*.
  2. Have a physician licensed in the state of Colorado provide a written recommendation for medical marijuana. This recommendation needs to come from a doctor who has a bona-fide physician-patient relationship with you. Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  3. You will need to provide a copy of your proof of identity in the form of a Colorado Driver’s License or photo ID.
  4. If you don’t have a Colorado ID, you must submit a Proof of Residency Waiver Request Form* and proof of residency documentation.
  5. Mail the appropriate documentation and a check or money order for $15 to:CDPHE
    HSV-8608
    4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
    Denver, CO 80246
  6. It may take up to 60 days to receive your card in the mail. 

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Colorado

Caregivers may be confused about the regulations that limit the growth and sale of pot to their patients. In 2015, lawmakers passed Senate Bill 14*, which allows caregivers to grow up to 6 plants (with a maximum or 3 mature plants) per patient. The total number of plants cannot exceed 99. To be a caregiver, a patient must acknowledge you during their application process. Caregiver registration is separate and voluntary, but it provides extra protection from the law if your growing facility is inspected. You are required to grow your pot in an enclosed, locked facility. Caregiver registration does not give you the right to sell recreational pot or to sell pot to patients other than your own. Colorado is currently working on creating a public access program for the testing of medical marijuana. All recreational cannabis must be tested for potency prior to being sold. The same regulations do not apply to medical marijuana, but those rules may change in the near future.  If you are currently a caregiver or considering caregiver registration, visit the CDPHE website* for more information.

  1. Submit a Caregiver Acknowledgement Form* along with your patient’s application or change form. These forms must be submitted together.
  2. Optional: If you choose to be added to the Voluntary Caregiver Registry, fill out a Voluntary Caregiver Registration Form* and submit it with a copy of your photo ID to:CDPHE
    HSV-8608
    4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
    Denver, CO 80246

How to Renew Your Colorado Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

To renew your Medical Marijuana Card in Colorado, simply re-apply 30-60 days prior to the expiration date on your card. Cards are good for one year or until the expiration date listed.

Colorado Medical Marijuana Restrictions

  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Be a Colorado resident
  • Not be the patient’s physician
  • Not have a caregiver of their own (they are permitted to be patients)

As long as a patient or caregiver meets all the requirements for application, there are no further restrictions beyond registration.

Forms and Resources

  • All the necessary contact information and resources can be found at the Colorado CDPHE website here.
  • A complete list of forms can be found here.

Colorado

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2012

Wyoming laws do not allow patients with debilitating medical conditions to use cannabis as a treatment. In 2014, the Wyoming chapter or NORML began drafting a petition to legalize both medical and recreational marijuana. In January of 2015, the Wyoming Secretary of State approved the initiative. The petition is currently collecting signatures from registered voters in the state and needs to collect at least 25,673 by February of 2016. If successful, the Peggy A Kelly Wyoming Cannabis Act* will appear on the ballot in 2016.

If you live in Wyoming and want to help change your state’s policies on medical marijuana, please consider signing the Peggy A Kelly Wyoming Cannabis Act*. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Wyoming, being under the influence of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in jail and fines up to $750. Unlawful personal use or possession of less than 3 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of more than 3 ounces of cannabis is a felony punishable by 5 years imprisonment and up to $10,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a felony worth up to 10 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000. Read the Wyoming Controlled Substances Act* for more information.

Wyoming

Status: Inactive

Sadly, the state of Idaho does not currently allow patients to use marijuana or marijuana-infused products for medical reasons. Despite sharing a border with both  Oregon and Washington, Idaho legislators have been slow to act on medical marijuana. In 2015, two separate bills were introduced to the Idaho senate in an attempt to legalize cannabidiol (CBD), but both bills failed to pass the legislative process. The first bill, S 1106* died when the legislative session ended in April. Senate Bill 1146* passed in both the senate and house, but was vetoed by Governor Butch Otto. Both proposals were significantly more conservative than laws already passed in other states, but Idaho lawmakers remain staunchly opposed to medical cannabis. Currently, citizens of Idaho are doing what they can to take the legalization of medical marijuana into their own hands. New Approach Idaho is an organization that is petitioning to have medical cannabis put on the ballot in 2016. They need to gather approximately 50,000 signatures by April 30th, 2016. If you are a registered Idaho voter, please consider signing this petition. Thousands of patients with debilitating medical conditions have already benefitted from medical marijuana. Passing this law would make cannabis available to those in Idaho who want to find an alternative to potentially dangerous prescription drugs.

If you live in Idaho and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, take a look at the petition at New Approach Idaho’s website. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Idaho, unlawful personal use or possession of 3 ounces or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of 3 ounces to 1 pound is a felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Sale or delivery of 1 to 5 pounds of cannabis (or 25-50 plants) is a misdemeanor worth 1 year in prison and fines of up to $50,000. Sale or delivery of 5 to 25 pounds of marijuana (or 50-100 plants) is a felony punishable by 3 years imprisonment and fines up to $50,000. Sale or delivery of more than 25 pounds of marijuana (or more than 100 plants) is punishable by up to 5 years in prison and fines up to $50,000. Read Idaho Uniform Controlled Substances Act* for more information.

Idaho

Status: Inactive

North Dakota has not yet joined the ranks of cannabis-friendly states. Citizens of North Dakota do not have access to medical marijuana as a treatment for debilitating illnesses. On January 19th, 2015, House Bill 1430* was introduced in attempt to decriminalize marijuana for registered patients. The bill would have allowed patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis without penalty. Sadly, the bill failed by a vote of 26-67 on February 18th, 2015. We hope that North Dakota legislators will continue to discuss medical marijuana and treat it as a valid option for patients who are suffering in the state.

If you live in North Dakota and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please keep your eyes open and support legislation in 2016. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In North Dakota, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in prison a fine of up to $1,500. Possession of more than 1 ounce is a felony punishable by a maximum of 10 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $20,000. Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a felony punishable by 3-10 years in prison and fines up to $20,000. Sale or distribution within 1,000 feet of a school is a felony worth $20,000 in fines and up to 20 years in prison. Read the North Dakota Uniform Controlled Substances Act* for more information.

North Dakota

Status: Inactive

South Dakota seems very slow to introduce new policies on medical marijuana. In 2010, Initiative 13* was placed on the ballot in an attempt to legalize medical cannabis, but 63% of citizens voted against the program. South Dakota legislators have not had any further success with legalizing medical cannabis and no new proposals have been introduced in 2015.

If you live in South Dakota and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In South Dakota, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000. Possession of 2 ounces to 1/2 pound of marijuana is a felony punishable by 1 year in prison and fines of up to $4,000. Possession of 1/2 to 2 pounds is a felony worth 5 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000. Unlawful possession of 1-10 pounds of cannabis is a felony worth up to 10 years imprisonment and fines of up to $20,000. Possession of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is punishable by up to 15 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $30,000. Sale or distribution of less than 1/2 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by 15 days to 1 year in prison and/or a fine of up to $2,000. Sale or distribution of more than 1/2 ounce of marijuana is a felony worth up to 2-15 years in prison and fines of $4,000-$30,000 (depending on the amount). Read South Dakota Codified Laws Sec. 22* for more information.

South Dakota

Status: Inactive

Nebraska does not currently allow patients in the state to use cannabis for medical purposes. Still, there is hope for the future. On May 27th, 2015 Governor Pete Ricketts signed LB390* into law, which allows for the limited use or cannabidiol (CBD) to treat patients with seizure disorders. Also, in January of 2015, Senator Tommy Garrett introduced LB643*, which proposes the Cannabis Compassion and Care Act. The Act would be similar to the medical marijuana laws already in place in other states. It would allow patients with qualifying conditions to register and purchase medical marijuana from state dispensaries. Unfortunately, the legislative session in Nebraska ended on May 29th of 2015, so the bill will not be passed this year. Instead, the bill will carry over to 2016 for consideration.

If you live in Nebraska and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider supporting LB643* in 2016. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Nebraska, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is an infraction punishable by a fine of up to $300. A second offense is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $500. Possession of more than 1 ounce, but less than 1 pound is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 3 months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $500. Possession of more than 1 pound of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000. Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by 1-20 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $25,000. Read the Nebraska Revised Statutes Chapter 28* for more information.

Nebraska

Status: Inactive

Unfortunately, the state of Kansas does not currently support the use of marijuana or marijuana-infused products as a treatment for medical conditions. In 2015, a bill known as the Cannabis Compassion and Care Act* (SB1 and HB2011) was introduced to both the house and senate, but neither bill managed to advance before the crossover date. The bill would have made allowances for the use of cannabis by registered patients with debilitating medical conditions. A slightly different bill, House Bill 2049*, was proposed to the Kansas House of Representatives in May of 2015 and was passed by a vote of 81 to 36. HB 2049* allows the use of cannabis oil as a treatment for children suffering from severe seizure disorders. The bill still needs to pass in the Kansas Senate before it can be signed into law, but families with children suffering from seizure disorders are hopeful that their children will soon have access to this alternative treatment. Kansas residents who support medical marijuana should consider supporting this bill, because it opens the door for further discussion about the medical benefits of cannabis and cannabis-related products.

If you live in Kansas and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider voicing your opinion to your senators and house representatives. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Kansas, unlawful personal use or possession of 450 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. Any subsequent offenses or possession of more than 450 grams is a felony punishable by up to 3.5 years in prison and $100,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of any amount of cannabis is a felony worth up to 204 months in prison and fines of up to $500,000 (depending on the amount). Read Kansas Statutes, Article 57* for more information.

Kansas

Status: Inactive

Louisiana is taking steps in 2015 to legalize medical marijuana. Governor Bobby Jindal signed Senate Bill 143* into law on June 29th of this year.  The new law allows for the use of cannabis-related products (such as pills and oils), but regulations still need to be determined before patients will have access. Some lawmakers are concerned that the bill has not legalized medical marijuana because it uses the word “prescribe”. According to the federal government, doctors cannot prescribe marijuana because it is a schedule 1 drug; physicians are only permitted to ‘recommend’ it. The new Louisiana law allows patients with a doctor’s prescription to possess marijuana, but it does not cover possession limits or dispensaries. Louisiana has until December 1st of 2016 to create a system for the growth, distribution and medical use of cannabis. Louisiana State University has offered to cultivate the drug, but no decisions have been made. If you are a Louisiana resident, keep your eyes open for more news on Louisiana’s medical cannabis program.

Please also consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Louisiana, unlawful personal use or possession of 14 grams or less of marijuana is punishable by up to 15 days in prison and a fine of up to $300. Possession of 14 grams to 2.5 pounds of cannabis is punishable by up to 6 months in prison and $500 in fines. Possession of more than 2.5 pounds of marijuana, but less than 60 pounds is punishable by 2 to 10 years imprisonment and up to $30,000 in fines. Possession of 60 pounds or more of marijuana is a felony punishable by 5-40 years in prison and up to $1,000,000 in fines. Distribution or cultivation of any amount of cannabis is a felony worth 5-90 years in prison and fines of up to $200,000. Read Louisiana Revised Statutes 40:966* for more information.

Louisiana

Status: Inactive

Sadly, the state of Arkansas does not currently allow patients to use marijuana or marijuana-infused products for medical reasons. In 2012, the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act*, also known as Issue 5, attempted to legalize medical marijuana. Issue 5 made it onto the November 6th, 2012 ballot, but was not passed by voters. Currently, an organization called Arkansas for Compassionate Care is sponsoring a new petition for the 2016 ballot. The Arkansas Medical Cannabis Act* was certified by the Attorney General and is currently collecting signatures. The petition needs to collect 65,000 signatures by registered Arkansas voters before it will make the ballot in 2016. If you are a registered Arkansas voter, please consider signing this petition. Thousands of patients with debilitating medical conditions have already benefitted from medical marijuana. Passing this law would make cannabis available to those in Arkansas who want to find an alternative to potentially dangerous prescription drugs.

If you live in Arkansas and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, take a look at the Arkansas for Compassionate Care website. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Arkansas, unlawful personal use or possession of 4 ounces or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. Possession of 4 ounces to 10 pounds is a felony punishable by up to 6 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Possession of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 30 years imprisonment and up to $15,000 in fines. Sale or delivery of 14 grams or less of cannabis is a misdemeanor worth 1 year in prison and fines of up to $2,500. Sale or delivery of 14 grams to 4 ounces of marijuana is a felony punishable by 6 years imprisonment and fines up to $10,000. Sale or delivery of more than 4 ounces of marijuana is punishable by up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $15,000 (depending on the amount). Read Arkansas Code Section 5-64* for more information.

Arkansas

Status: Inactive

Sadly, the state of Missouri has not yet passed legislation that allows patients to use marijuana for medical purposes. In 2015, two separate bills were brought to the Missouri House of Representatives, House Bill 800* and House Bill 490*. Both bills proposed medical cannabis programs that would allow for the creation of state dispensaries and both bills died when the session ended in May. Missouri does not currently allow the use of any cannabis-related products as medical treatment.

Thousands of patients across America have already benefitted from the use of medical cannabis. If you live in Missouri and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved with your state legislature, or participating nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana canbe used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Missouri, unlawful personal use or possession of 35 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and  a fine of up to $1000. Possession of more than 35 grams but less than 100kg is a felony punishable by a maximum of 15 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $20,000 (depending on the amount). Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by 5 years-life in prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000. Read the Missouri Revised Statutes Chapter 195* for more information.

Missouri

Status: Inactive

Currently, Iowa does not allow patients to use marijuana as a treatment for medical conditions. However, in 2014, legislation was passed that allows the limited use of Cannabidiol Oil (CBD) by patients suffering from epilepsy. The state has implemented a system that allows qualifying patients to apply for a Registered Cannabidiol Card. If you or someone you know is suffering from epilepsy and may benefit from the use of Cannabidiol, take a look at the Iowa Department of Public Health’s website for more information. One huge problem remains for patients who are eligible for a card- it is currently still illegal to cultivate marijuana or purchase CBD. No system is in place to help patients acquire CBD, even if they are legally allowed to use it.

In Iowa, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. A second offense is a misdemeanor punishable by 1 year in prison and fines of up to $1,875. Third and subsequent offenses are misdemeanors punishable by up to 2 years in prison and $6,250 in fines. Cultivation or distribution of less than 50kg of marijuana is a felony punishable by 5 years imprisonment and fines up to $7,500. Cultivation or distribution of 50-100kg of marijuana is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $50,000. Cultivation or distribution of more than 100kg of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 50 years in prison and fines of $1,000,000 (depending on the amount). Read the Iowa Code- Controlled Substances* for more information.

If you are an Iowa resident interested in supporting medical marijuana legislation in your state, take a look at Iowans for Medical Marijuana. They have information regarding ongoing legislation, case studies and videos to help you stay educated and prepared. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Intractable Epilepsy

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    No

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Iowa

Please Note: Only patients with intractable epilepsy are currently eligible for a Cannabidiol card.

  1. Download the Application* form from the Iowa DPH website.
  2. Fill out Section 1: Patient Information.
    • If you would like to designate a primary caregiver, or if the patient is under 18 years old, fill out Section 2: Primary Caregiver Information.
  3. Make a copy of your Iowa Driver’s License or State ID (use the caregiver’s ID if the patient is a minor).
  4. Deliver the completed application and photocopies of your ID to your Neurologist. Your Neurologist must complete Section 3: Neurologist Recommendation, then mail the application to Iowa DPH.
  5. You will receive a notice by mail if your application is approved. Instructions on how to obtain your card will be included. There is no information on renewal or expiration at this time.

Iowa

Status: Limited

Law Signed: 2014

If you live in Minnesota and have a qualifying condition, you can apply for registration to the Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program. This gives you or your designated caregiver the right to purchase and possess medical cannabis products from a state licensed Cannabis Patient Center. Minnesota law does not allow patients to use or possess any buds, leaves or other raw plant materials. The only Cannabis products patients can have are oils, pills and liquids that are properly labeled by one of the state’s Cannabis Patient Centers. Please take a few moments to read through the following information regarding your medical cannabis rights.

In Minnesota, unlawful personal use or possession of 42.5 grams or less of marijuana is a petty misdemeanor punishable by a fine of $200 and participation in a drug education program. If you are caught with 42.5 grams or less of marijuana in a motor vehicle, it is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $1000. Possession of more than 42.5 grams is a felony punishable by a maximum of 30 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $1,000,000 (depending on the amount). Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 35 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $1,250,000 (depending on the amount). Read Minnesota Statute Chapter 311 S.F. No. 2740* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Tourette’s Syndrome
    AALS
    Crohn;s Disease
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Chronic Pain
    Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe or Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Any terminal illness with probable life expectancy of less than one year

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    30-day supply

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Chapter 311 S.F. No. 2740*
    Chapter 4770-Medical Cannabis*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

Minnesota Medical Marijuana Card

The state of Minnesota does allow patients with qualifying medical conditions to register for medical cannabis. This gives them the right to obtain and use marijuana-related products from a state licensed Cannabis Patient Center. Minnesota law does not allow patients to use or possess any buds, leaves or other raw plant materials. The only Cannabis products patients can have are oils, pills and liquids that are properly labeled by one of the state’s Cannabis Patient Centers. We’ve outlined the steps to completing your registration below. Your program registration is good for one year unless otherwise indicated.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Minnesota

  1. Before you can register for the Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program, your condition must be certified by a doctor, physician assistant or advanced practice registered nurse. Make an appointment with your doctor and be sure to give him/her the following:
    • Your personal e-mail address
    • A completed and signed Patient E-mail Acknowledgement Form*
    • Ask your doctor for an appointment summary and a list of medications that are currently prescribed to you. You will need these documents before you can purchase products from a Cannabis Patient Center.
  2. When your doctor has completed your certification, you will receive an e-mail that contains a confirmation of your condition and a registration link. This link is unique to you and is required for registration.
  3. Before you begin your online registration, make sure you have the following documents scanned to your computer:
    • You State ID, Driver’s License or Passport
    • A credit/debit card or a check.
    • If you have any of the following, you may qualify for a reduced application fee: CHAMPVA, Medicaid, MinnesotaCare, Social Security Disability (SSD), or Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
  4. Click the link in your e-mail and complete the online registration process.
  5. You will be asked to pay a fee of $200 for your application. If you qualify for the reduced fee, the cost is $50.
  6. You’ll receive an e-mail when your account has been approved. Before you can purchase marijuana-related products, you must complete the following forms and bring them to the Cannabis Patient Center:
    • The Patient Self-Evaluation can be accessed through your online account with the Medical Cannabis Patient Registry. You must complete a new Patient Self-Evaluation every time you purchase cannabis products.
    • The appointment summary and list of medications that you received from your doctor.
    • A photo ID
  7. When you visit a Cannabis Patient Center, you will be asked for the forms listed above and a pharmacist will write a dosage recommendation for the appropriate amount of marijuana-related oils, liquids or pills. You will not be allowed to purchase more than a 30-day supply at a time.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Minnesota

Minnesota does not allow home cultivation of any kind by patients or caregivers. Minnesota law does not allow patients to use or possess any buds, leaves or other raw plant materials. The only Cannabis products patients can have are oils, pills and liquids that are properly labeled by one of the state’s Cannabis Patient Centers. The state has designated two manufacturing centers, which are responsible for producing marijuana-related products and providing them to Cannabis Patient Centers. Caregivers are permitted to transport and administer cannabis based oils, liquids and pills to their patients. According to state law, smoke and edibles are not acceptable forms of medical cannabis.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Minnesota

Parents or legal guardians of minor patients will receive an e-mail after the patient registration is complete. You must login to the online system using the link provided and complete the Parent/Legal Guardian Registration. You will also be asked to upload your State ID, Driver’s License or Passport during the application.

If the patient is an adult, their doctor must recommend a caregiver before you can register. Once the doctor has recommended a caregiver and the patient completes his/her registration, you will receive an e-mail to set up your caregiver account. You will be asked to upload a copy of your Driver’s License, Sate ID or Passport during the process. Once your online registration is complete, print and fill out the Designated Caregiver Background Check Informed Consent* page. Mail this form and a check for $15 to:

Bureau of Criminal Apprehension
CHA Unit
1430 Maryland Ave.
E. St. Paul, MN 55106

It may take several weeks for your background check to be processed. Once approved, you will receive an e-mail from the MDH and you can begin assisting your patient.

Please keep in mind that a new Self-Evaluation Form is required every time you or your patient purchase marijuana based products. You are permitted to complete this form for your patient. You will be asked for a valid ID when you purchase cannabis-related products.

How to Renew Your Minnesota Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Patients and caregivers must repeat all of the steps listed above annually to maintain their registration. Fees are the same for new applicants and renewals.

Minnesota Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You have ever been convicted of a drug-related felony

Minnesota

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2014

Unfortunately, the state of Mississippi does not currently allow patients to use medical marijuana as a treatment for debilitating conditions. In 2015, Senate Bill 2318* was proposed in an attempt to legalize medical marijuana, but the bill died in committee on February 3rd of 2015. Still, there is some hope that Mississippi may be on the path to reforming their position on medical cannabis. On July 1st, 2015 House Bill 1231*, also known as Harper Grace’s Act, took effect. This very limited bill allows patients with debilitating epileptic conditions to obtain and use cannabis extracts with a very low THC content. Several universities were given permission by the state to produce the cannabis extracts, however, the bill is too new to know which, if any, of those universities will choose to participate.

If you live in Mississippi and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Mississippi, unlawful personal use or possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana is punishable by a fine of up to $250. A second offense is punishable by up to 60 days imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $250. Possession of more than 30 grams is a felony punishable by a maximum of 30 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $1,000,000 (depending on the amount). Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by 3 years-life in prison and/or a fine of up to $1,000,000. Read the Mississippi Controlled Substances Act* for more information.

Mississippi

Status: Inactive

Unfortunately, the state of Alabama does not currently allow the use of Marijuana for medical conditions. In April of 2015 the Medical Marijuana Patient Safe Access Act (SB 326)*, was introduced by Senator Bobby Singleton in an effort to legalize Medical Marijuana, but it died on the senate floor when the session ended.

In January of 2014, Alabama Senate Bill 174*, also known as “Carly’s Law”, was passed, which allowed for limited use of cannabidiol (CBD) for patients with a “debilitating epileptic condition”. The law was passed in an effort to allow the Neurology Department at the University of Alabama Birmingham to conduct a research study on the “medical uses and benefits of cannabidiol (CBD) for 21 individuals with debilitating epileptic conditions” (see SB174* below). The law only allows the drug to be prescribed by a neurologist at University of Alabama Birmingham, and only in conjunction with one research study.

If you live in Alabama and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, consider taking a look at the Alabama Safe Access Project website. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Alabama, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $6,000. Possession of any amount of marijuana for non-personal use is a felony punishable by 1-10 years imprisonment and up to $15,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a felony worth 2-10 years in prison and fines of up to $30,000. Read Alabama Code Section 13A* for more information.

Alabama

Status: Inactive

Unfortunately, the state of Florida does not currently allow patients to use marijuana or marijuana-infused products for medical purposes. In 2014, House Bill 683* was submitted by State Representative Greg Steube in and attempt to legalize medical marijuana. In 2015, Senator Jeff Brandes filed the similar Senate Bill 528*. Unfortunately, both the House Bill and Senate Bill died when their respective legislative sessions ended. In 2014 Senate Bill 1030* was passed, which opened the door for legislation regarding low-THC strains of medical marijuana. Based on this bill, a State Judge ruled in favor of legalizing a low-potency strain of cannabis call Charlotte’s Web on May 28th, 2015. Legislators voted 20 to 14 to approve the legalization. Florida residents can expect to see a medical marijuana registration system in place by the end of 2015. Currently, lawmakers are debating the regulations that will apply to the growth, distribution and possession of marijuana for patients with a physician’s written recommendation. Charlotte’s Web has only been proposed to treat patients with epilepsy or cancer, but the list of qualifying conditions may change as new legislation is written. Residents of Florida should keep their eyes open for news on the Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act*. Thousands of patients with debilitating medical conditions have already benefitted from medical marijuana in America. Creating a state registry system would make cannabis available to those in Florida who want to find an alternative to potentially dangerous prescription drugs.

If you live in Florida and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please keep yourself informed about the Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act*. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Florida, unlawful personal use or possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of 20 grams to 25 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and $5,000 in fines. Possession of more than 25 pounds of cannabis is a felony worth up to 30 years imprisonment and $200,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of 20 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor worth up to 1 year in prison and fines of up to $1,000. Sale or distribution of 25 pounds or less of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 5 years in prison and $5,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of more than 25 pounds of marijuana is punishable by up to 30 years imprisonment and $200,00 in fines. Read Florida Criminal Code Chapters 893 and 775* for more information.

Florida

Status: Inactive

Georgia residents can celebrate the recent news created by passing House Bill 1*, which legalizes the use and possession of cannabis oil for patients with the following conditions: cancer, Crohn’s Disease, ALS, mitochondrial disease, Parkinson’s Disease, seizure disorders and sickle cell disease. Earlier this year, Senate Bill 7* was submitted in an attempt to legalize marijuana in its plant from, but the bill died when it failed to advance before it’s crossover date. The use and cultivation of marijuana in plant form or as an edible product is still illegal, but Georgia will be forced to change some of those laws in the near future in order to create the now-legal cannabis oil. Huge hurdles still exist surrounding the regulation of marijuana-based products, but the future is looking up. Keep your eyes open for news about medical marijuana laws and registration. Thousands of patients with debilitating medical conditions have already benefitted from medical marijuana. The current work being done has the potential to make cannabis available to those in Georgia who want to find an alternative to potentially dangerous prescription drugs.

If you live in Georgia and want to support your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, consider visiting GeorgiaCannabis.org. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Georgia, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of more than 1 ounce of marijuana is a felony punishable by 1-10 years imprisonment and up to $5,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of 10 pounds or less of marijuana is a felony worth 1-10 years in prison and fines of up to $5,000. Sale or distribution of more than 10 pounds of cannabis is a felony worth up to 30 years imprisonment and $1,000,000 in fines. Read Georgia Code Title 16* for more information.

Georgia

Status: Inactive

Tennessee does not currently allow the use of medical cannabis as a treatment for debilitating illnesses. In April of 2015, however, legislators passed Senate Bill 280*, which redefines marijuana by excluding low-THC cannabis oil (CBD) from prosecution under Tennessee’s controlled substances act. The bill does not allow for the cultivation of marijuana or the production of cannabis oil, so residents of Tennessee will have to obtain the oil from another state. The new law went into effect on May 4th, 2015 and provides hope for patients suffering from seizure disorders and other debilitating conditions. More work will need to be done to give patients safe access to CBD, but residents of Tennessee can look forward to more progress in 2016.

If you live in Tennessee and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. You can stay up to date on current legislation by visiting our website or checking with the Marijuana Policy Project here. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Tennessee, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1/2 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $250. A second offense is punishable by 1 year in prison and a fine of $500. All subsequent offenses are felonies punishable by up to 6 years in prison and fines up to $1,000. Sale or distribution of 1/2 ounce to 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 1 to 6 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $5,000. Sale or distribution of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony worth up to 60 years in prison and fines of $200,000 (depending on the amount). Read Tennessee Code Title 39* for more information.

Tennessee

Status: Inactive

Medical cannabis is currently illegal in Wisconsin, and no measures have been taken to legalize it in 2015. In 2014, however, Governor Scott Walker signed Assembly Bill 726* into law. The bill allows children with severe epilepsy to use low-THC forms of cannabidiol (CBD) as medical treatment. Sale and cultivation of marijuana are still illegal in Wisconsin, so lawmakers are in the process of determining how patients will gain access to the drug. The bill does not allow adults or patients with non-seizure related illnesses to use cannabidiol.

If you live in Wisconsin and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please encourage your state legislators to take action. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Wisconsin, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. A second offense is a felony punishable by up to 3 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Sale or distribution of 200 grams or less of cannabis is punishable by 3.5 years imprisonment and fines of $10,000. Sale or distribution of 200-1000 grams of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 6 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Sale or delivery of more than 1000 grams of marijuana is a felony worth up to $50,000 in fines and 15 years in prison (depending on the amount). Read Wisconsin Statutes Section 961.14* for more information.

Wisconsin

Status: Inactive

In 2013, the state of Illinois passed the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Act*. The act permits patients with qualifying conditions to apply for a medical marijuana card in Illinois, however, the law only allows for a four-year trial program. The Illinois DPH is responsible for issuing cards and establishing state dispensaries. The temporary system is called the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program*. The DPH started accepting patient applications in 2014, but no state dispensaries are open yet. Home cultivation is not allowed under the new law, so patients will have to wait until dispensaries are open to legally purchase marijuana. If the temporary program is successful, Illinois plans to establish more permanent laws to protect medical marijuana patients and help them acquire cannabis.

In Illinois, unlawful personal use or possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and fines of $1,500-2,500. A second offense is a felony punishable by up to 6 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $25,000. Possession of more than 30 grams is a felony punishable by a maximum of 30 years imprisonment (depending on the amount) and/or a fine of up to $25,000. Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute may be a misdemeanor or a felony punishable by up to 60 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $200,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. Read the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Act* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
    Agitation of Alzheimer’s disease
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
    Arnold-Chiari malformation and Syringomelia
    Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    Cancer
    Causalgia
    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
    Crohn’s disease
    CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type II)
    Dystonia
    Fibromyalgia (severe)
    Fibrous dysplasia
    Glaucoma
    Hepatitis C
    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
    Hydrocephalus
    Interstitial Cystitis
    Lupus
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Muscular dystrophy
    Myasthenia Gravis
    Myoclonus
    Nail-patella syndrome
    Neurofibromatosis
    Parkinson’s disease
    Post-concussion syndrome
    RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type I)
    Residual limb pain
    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
    Seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy
    Sjogren’s syndrome
    Spinal cord disease, including, but not limited to, arachnoiditis, Tarlov cysts, hydromyelia, syringomyelia
    Spinal cord injury
    Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
    Tourette’s syndrome
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2.5 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes, but n

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Act (2013)
    Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Patient Registry (2014)

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Illinois

Please Note: Patients in Illinois have the option of filling out either an online application or mailing a paper application. If using the online system, all required paperwork must be uploaded onto your computer and submitted electronically. The online application provides clear instructions and can be saved and reopened if needed. Visit the Illinois DPH website here to create an account and fill out your application. See the list of required documents below. The following instructions are for applicants who choose to mail a paper application.

  1. Download and print the following documents:
    • Application for Registry Identification Card for Qualifying Patients*
    • Application for a Designated Caregiver Registration Card* (if you choose to designate a caregiver)
    • Physician Written Certification Form*
    • Fingerprint Consent Form*
    • For Minors Only: download the Application for Registry Identification Card for Qualifying Patients Under the Age of 18 and Their Designated Caregivers* and the Reviewing Physician Certification Form for Qualifying Patients Under 18 Years of Age*
  2. You and/or your caregiver must fill out the forms listed above.
  3. Make a photocopy of your Driver’s License or Government-issued ID as proof of identity and age.
  4. Make a photocopy of one of the proof of residency documents listed on the application.
  5. Include a passport-sized photograph of yourself (see application for details).
  6. Before submitting your application, you must contact a live scan fingerprint vendor to set up an appointment. See a list of fingerprint vendors here. You will take the Fingerprint Consent Form* with you to your fingerprinting appointment and mail the completed form with your application.
  7. A physician must fill out the Physician Written Certification Form* and mail it to the state separately. You will not include this form in your application.
    • If the patient is a minor, a second physician must fill out the Reviewing Physician Certification Form for Qualifying Patients under 18 Years of Age*. This form must also be mailed by the physician.
    • If you are a veteran currently being treated at a VA hospital, you do not need to submit this form. Instead, you must submit VA Form 10-5345 for a release of your medical records. Once you receive your medical records, you will mail these records in with your application along with a DD214 Form. See the application for more details.
  8. You will be required to select a medical cannabis dispensary or zone. Zones are listed on the application by county.
  9. Include a check or money order for $100 dollars made out to the Illinois Department of Public Health. If you are applying online, use a credit or debit card. You may qualify for a reduced fee of $50. See the application for more details.
  10. Mail all the required forms to: 

    Illinois Department of Public Health
    Division of Medical Cannabis
    535 West Jefferson Street
    Springfield, Illinois 62761-0001

  11. If you are applying online, you will receive an email notifying you that your application is received. If you are applying with a paper application, you will be notified by mail. If approved, you will receive your card within 45 days of submitting your application.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Illinois

Patients and caregivers in Illinois are not permitted to grow or cultivate marijuana. All marijuana and marijuana infused products must be purchased from a state-licensed dispensary. Currently, there are no operating state dispensaries in Illinois. The Illinois DPH is working on opening dispensaries based on regional districts. Patients will have a designated district printed on their card, which will enable them to purchase marijuana from only one dispensary.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Illinois

Caregivers in Illinois do not grow marijuana for their patients like caregivers in other states. The primary responsibility of a caregiver is to obtain and administer medical marijuana to their patients when needed. In order to become a primary caregiver, you must fill out the Application for a Designated Caregiver Registration Card* and mail this form in with your patient’s application. Each patient in Illinois is allowed to have only one caregiver, and each caregiver can have only one patient. Follow the steps below to become a registered caregiver in Illinois:

  1. Print and fill out the Application for a Designated Caregiver Registration Card*.
  2. Print the Fingerprint Consent Form*.
  3. Make a photocopy of your Driver’s License or Government-issued ID as proof of identity and age.
  4. Make a photocopy of one of the proof of residency documents listed on the application.
  5. Include a passport-sized photograph of yourself (see application for details).
  6. Before submitting your application, you must contact a live scan fingerprint vendor to set up an appointment. See a list of fingerprint vendors here. You will take the Fingerprint Consent Form* with you to your fingerprinting appointment and mail the completed form with your application.
  7. Include a check or money order for $25 dollars made out to the Illinois Department of Public Health. If you are applying online, use a credit or debit card.
  8. Mail all the required forms and your patient’s application to:Illinois Department of Public Health
    Division of Medical Cannabis
    535 West Jefferson Street
    Springfield, Illinois 62761-0001
  9. If you are applying online, you will receive an email notifying you that your application is received. If you are applying with a paper application, you will be notified by mail. If approved, you will receive your card within 45 days of submitting your application.

How to Renew Your Illinois Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

To renew your Registry Identification Card or Designated Caregiver Registration Card, follow the same steps listed above. Check the appropriate boxes on the application to mark it as a renewal.

Illinois Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Illinois Caregiver Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You have ever been convicted of an excluded felony (see the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program* for a list of excluded felonies).

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Illinois

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2013

Michigan residents have the option of applying for a medical marijuana card if they have a qualifying condition. The Michigan Medical Marijuana Act* was passed in 2008 by 63% of voters. Michigan’s laws allow registered patients and caregivers to carry or transport up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis at a time. If you live in Michigan and you think you may qualify for a medical marijuana card, read on to understand your rights.

In Michigan, unlawful possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in jail and a fine of up to $2000. Public use or possession is a felony punishable by up to 2 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $2,000. Sale or cultivation of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 15 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. Read the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act* for more information.

Patients and caregivers should note that transportation of marijuana in Michigan is only legal if the Marijuana is carried in an enclosed case in the trunk of your car. It is illegal to carry cannabis in the passenger compartment of any motor vehicle.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    Nail-patella Syndrome
    Epilepsy
    Multiple Sclerosis
    PTSD
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Muscle Spasms

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2.5 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 12 plants and refer to the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act* for further restrictions on home cultivation

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    No

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Michigan Medical Marijuana Act*
    Amendments: HB4856*, HB4834*, HB4851*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes. Caregivers must keep a record of all monetary exchanges made

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

Michigan Medical Marijuana Card

The state of Michigan does allow patients with qualifying medical conditions to apply for a Registry ID card. This gives them the right to obtain and use marijuana without any nasty legal consequences. We’ve outlined the steps to acquiring a card below. Medical marijuana cards are good for two years or until the expiration date listed on the card. Michigan does not allow state dispensaries, so you must either choose a registered caregiver, or grow your own.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Michigan

  1. Download and fill out the MMMP Application Packet* or the MMMP Minor Application Packet*.
  2. Make a photocopy of your Michigan Driver’s License, State ID or another form of photo ID. If you are submitting photo ID other than a Driver’s License or Sate ID, you must also submit a copy of your Michigan Voter Registration Card as proof of residency.
    • Minor applications must include a photocopy of the parent or legal guardian’s photo ID and proof of parentage or legal guardianship (birth certificate or court order).
  3. Have a licensed physician fill out the Physician Certification Form* included in your application packet.
    • Minor applicants must provide two Physician Certification Forms* (included in the MMMP Minor Application Packet*.
  4. Decide if you will grow your own cannabis or designate a caregiver. If you choose to designate a caregiver, fill out the Caregiver Information section of the application form and have your caregiver sign the form. The caregiver must also provide a copy of his/her photo ID.
    • If you are applying on behalf of a minor, the parent or legal guardian must register as the patient’s caregiver.
  5. Include a check or money order for the $60 patient application fee and the $25 caregiver application fee (if designating a caregiver).
  6. Mail all of the above documents and your check or money order to:Michigan Medical Marihuana Program
    PO Box 30083
    Lansing, MI 48909
  7. If your application is approved, you will receive your Registry ID Card in the mail within five weeks.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Michigan

The state of Michigan does not permit state dispensaries, so the patient or caregiver is required to grow marijuana. Patients or caregivers can grow up to 12 plants per patient, but all 12 plants must be in the same location. Plants must be cultivated in an enclosed, locked facility. Caregivers may have up to 5 patients at a time. A registered patient can legally grow marijuana for themselves, but they must register as a caregiver to grow marijuana for other patients. The state does not offer medical cannabis patients assistance in finding a caregiver.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Michigan

Caregivers in Michigan are allowed to have up to five patients at a time. Patients and caregivers register together using the same application packet. In order to register as a caregiver, simply fill out the Caregiver Information section on each of your patients’ applications and sign. Provide a copy of your photo ID to be sent in with each application.

If you are applying as a caregiver for patient who has already registered, have your patient print and fill out a Patient Change Form*. You will need to sign this form and provide a copy of your photo ID to be mailed with it. The caregiver application fee is $25.

How to Renew Your Michigan Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Unlike other states, Michigan Registry ID cards for both patients and caregivers are valid for two years unless otherwise stated. When it is time to renew, simply resubmit the MMMP Application Packet* by following the steps above. The required forms and fees are the same for both new patients and patients who are renewing their registration.

Michigan Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Michigan Caregiver Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You have been convicted of any felony in the past 10 years
  • You have ever been convicted of a felony involving illegal drugs or assault

Forms and Resources

Michigan

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2008

South Carolina does not currently allow the use of medical cannabis as a treatment for debilitating conditions. In 2015, three separate bills were introduced to the South Carolina House and Senate in an attempt to legalize medical marijuana, but all three bills died when the legislative session ended on June 4th, 2015. They may be revisited in 2016 when the new session meets, so stay alert for news about new legislation. In 2014, North Carolina passed House Bill 1220*, which allows patients with intractable epilepsy to possess and use cannabidiol (CBD). However, the law did not leave room for the cultivation of marijuana to produce the oil, and purchasing the oil is still illegal.

If you live in South Carolina and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please stay alert for news about House Bill 3140*, Senate Bill 672* and House Bill 4037* in 2016.  You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In South Carolina, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in prison and a fine of up to $200. A second offense is punishable by up to 1 year in jail and fines up to $2,000. Sale or distribution of less than 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 5 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $5,000 (more for subsequent offenses). Sale or distribution of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony worth up to 25 years in prison and fines of up to $50,000. Read South Carolina Code Title 24* for more information.

South Carolina

Status: Inactive

Unfortunately, North Carolina citizens do not have access to medical marijuana yet. In February of 2015, House Bill 78* was introduced to the North Carolina legislature, but unfortunately, it died in committee on March 25th, 2015. The bill was designed to create the North Carolina Medical Cannabis Act, which would have given registered patients access to up to 24 ounces of marijuana every 3 months. Sadly, medical marijuana is still unpopular among North Carolina legislators, although we hope to see new bills introduced during the 2016 session.

If you live in North Carolina, please keep yourself informed about upcoming legislation regarding medical marijuana. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In North Carolina, unlawful personal use or possession of 1/2 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $200. Possession of more than 1/2 ounce, but less than 1 ounce is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 45 days imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $1,000. Possession of more than 1.5 ounces of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 8 months in prison and fines of up to $1,000. Possession of any amount of marijuana over 10 pounds, or possession with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by 2-18 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $200,000. Read the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act* for more information.

North Carolina

Status: Inactive

In 2015, Indiana continued its battle to make marijuana available to patients who might benefit from it. Senate Bill 284* and House Bill 1487* were both proposed in January of this year in an attempt to legalize medical cannabis. Unfortunately, both bills died when they failed to advance before their legislative sessions ended. Still, we can expect to see the issue of medical marijuana come up again in the near future. Almost half of the states in America have already legalized medical marijuana, and recreational marijuana has begun to make an impact as well. Allowing cannabis to be used for medical treatment also allows doors to open for medical research and pharmacology.

If you are an Indiana resident, please keep yourself informed about medical marijuana laws by checking with the Indiana chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) and by keeping your eyes open for upcoming legislation. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Indiana, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 180 days in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. If you are found in possession of less than 30 grams of marijuana and you have a prior drug offense, it is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of $5,000. If you are found in possession of more than 30 grams of marijuana and you have a prior drug offense, it is a felony punishable by 6 months to 2 1/2 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Sale or cultivation of 30 grams or less of cannabis is a misdemeanor worth 1 year in prison and fines of up to $5,000. Sale or cultivation of 30 grams to 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 6 months to 2 1/2 years imprisonment and fines up to $10,000. Sale or cultivation of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is punishable by up to 6 years in prison and fines up to $10,000. Read Indiana Criminal Code Article 48* for more information.

Indiana

Status: Inactive

Kentucky is still among the 27 states that have failed to pass legislation regarding the use of medical marijuana. In January of 2015, Senate Bill 40* was proposed in an attempt to legalize cannabis for debilitating medical conditions, but the bill failed to advance out of committee by the deadline in March. The same story is true for House Bill 3*, which was also presented in January of this year. House Bill 3*, also known as the Gatewood Galbraith Medical Cannabis Act, focused on making cannabis-related products, such as oils and pills, available to children with severe seizure disorders. The committee’s inability to come to any agreements on the use and distribution of marijuana are delaying the state’s ability to pass pro-pot legislation. Some families in Kentucky and other states are moving to places with a more weed-friendly attitude in order to get access to cannabis-related medical treatment.

If you live in Kentucky, please consider doing what you can to support medical marijuana legislation. Thousands of patients with debilitating medical conditions have already benefitted from medical marijuana. Changing your state’s policies would make cannabis available to those in Kentucky who want to find an alternative to potentially dangerous prescription drugs. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance.

In Kentucky, unlawful personal use or possession of 8 ounces or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 45 days in prison and a fine of up to $250. Sale or distribution of less than 8 ounces of cannabis is a misdemeanor worth 1 year in prison and fines of up to $500. Subsequent offenses are felonies worth up to 5 years imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. Sale or distribution of 8 ounces to 5 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 5-10 years imprisonment and fines of up to $10,000. Sale or delivery of more than 5 pounds of marijuana is punishable by up to 20 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Read Kentucky Revised Statutes, Ch. 218A* for more information.

Kentucky

Status: Inactive

Unfortunately, Ohio has not yet legalized medical marijuana. Ohio legislators are currently debating House Bill 33*, which would legalize the use of cannabidiol (CBD) for patients with seizure disorders. The bill was introduced in February of 2015 by Representatives Wes Retherford and John Rogers, but the Ohio house has not yet voted on it. It does not legalize the use of marijuana in its plant form and does not make marijuana available to a wide range of  patients with debilitating conditions. Still, the bill gives us some hope that Ohio may be on the path to reforming their position on medical cannabis.

If you live in Ohio and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider getting involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Ohio, unlawful personal use or possession of 100 grams or less of marijuana is punishable by a fine of up to $150. Possession of 100-200 grams is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 30 days imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $250. Possession of more than 200 grams of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 8 years imprisonment and fines up to $20,000 (depending on the amount). Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 8 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000 (depending on the amount). Read the Ohio Code Sec. 2925* for more information.

Ohio

Status: Inactive

Medical cannabis is still illegal in West Virginia, but legislators tried to raise the issue in 2015. Senate Bill 546* and House Bill 2909* were both introduced on February 23rd, 2015, but sadly, both bills died when the legislative sessions ended in March. The bills were identical and proposed the creation of the Compassionate Use Act for Medical Cannabis. The Act would allow registered patients to possess up to 6 ounces of useable marijuana or cultivate up to 12 mature plants and 12 seedlings. West Virginians should keep their eyes open for similar bills in 2016.

If you live in West Virginia and want to help change your state’s policies on medical marijuana, stay alert for legislation in 2016 and let your state legislators know that you support medical cannabis. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In West Virginia, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by 90 days to 6 months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Sale or distribution of any amount of marijuana is a felony worth 1 to 5 years in prison and fines of up to $15,000. Read West Virginia Code Sec. 60A* for more information.

West Virginia

Status: Inactive

Medical cannabis is still illegal in Virginia, but legislators passed laws in 2015 which allow patients with debilitating seizures to use cannabidiol (CBD) as treatment. House Bill 1445* and Senate Bill 1235* were both signed into law on February 26th, 2015. The two bills are identical and give patients an affirmative defense in court for the possession and use of cannabidiol if they suffer from intractable epilepsy. Still, neither bill allows for the cultivation or safe distribution of cannabis-based products, so patients will have to purchase the drug out of state if they choose to use it.

If you live in Virginia and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please let your state representatives know how you feel. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Virginia, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1/2 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in prison and a fine of up to $500. A second offense is punishable by up to 1 year in prison and $2,500 in fines. Sale, manufacture or trafficking of 1/2 ounce to 5 pounds of cannabis is punishable by 1-10 years imprisonment and fines of $2,500. Sale, manufacture or trafficking of 5 pounds to 100kg of marijuana is a felony punishable by 5-30 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. Sale or possession of more than 100kg of cannabis is worth up to $100,000 in fines and life in prison. Read Virginia State Code, Title 18.2* for more information.

Virginia

Status: Limited

Law Signed: 2015

On April 14th, 2014, Governor Martin O’Malley signed House Bill 881* into law. The bill, now known as the Natalie M. LaPrade Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission*, is currently being developed for qualifying patients in Maryland. If you or someone you know is suffering from cachexia, anorexia, wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, or severe muscle spasms, the state of Maryland has approved the use of medical cannabis as a treatment. The MMCC is currently collecting applications from dispensaries and growers and is planning to have the full program in place by June of 2016. In September of 2015, the state will begin accepting applications from patients, but they have not yet made forms or information available to the public.

Maryland does not plan to allow patients or caregivers the right to grow marijuana, only to possess it and purchase it from state-licensed dispensaries. The law allows patients to carry up to a 30-day supply of marijuana with them at any given time, but the commission still needs to clarify an actual amount. The MMCC has published a proposed timeline, which can viewed on their website here. If you are a qualifying patient in Maryland, we encourage you to stay informed about your medical marijuana rights by checking back for updates on applications, dispensaries and registration cards.

In Maryland, unlawful personal use or possession of 10 grams or less of marijuana is a civil offense punishable by a fine of up to $100. Possession of 10 grams to 50 pounds of cannabis is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and $1,000 in fines. Possession of more than 50 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by a minimum of 5 years imprisonment and up to $100,000 in fines. Sale or trafficking of 5-45kg of cannabis is a felony worth 10 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000. Sale or trafficking of more than 45kg of cannabis id a felony worth up to 25 years imprisonment and $50,000 in fines. Read Maryland Code Sec. 5-402 and Sec. 5-601* for more information.

Maryland

Status: Linited

Law Signed: 2014

Residents of the first state in America do have access to medical marijuana if they qualify. In May of 2011, Senate Bill 17* was passed in Delaware, allowing patients with certain conditions to apply for a medical marijuana registration card. The law does not allow patients or caregivers to cultivate cannabis, instead they are required to purchase it from a state-licensed dispensary. The Delaware Medical Marijuana Act* was passed in 2011, but the first dispensary did not manage to open its doors until June 26th, 2015. The First State Compassion Center* is currently the only licensed dispensary available for patients in Delaware.

In Delaware, the unlawful use or possession of less then 175 grams of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to $575 in fines and 3 months in prison. Possession of more the 175grams is a felony and may be punished with up to 25 years in prison, depending on the amount. The unlawful sale or distribution of marijuana is a felony punishable by 8-25 years in jail. Registered patients in Delaware can legally carry up to 6 ounces (170 grams) of marijuana without penalty.

  •    QUALIFYING CONDITIONSAlzheimer’s
    ALS
    Cancer
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Severe, debilitating pain
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Intractable Nausea
    PTSD (In some cases)
    Seizures
    Severe or Persistent Muscle Spasms
  •    PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    6 ounces. Dispensaries cannot sell more than 3 ounces to one patient in a 14-day period.

  •    HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •    STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •    MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTESSenate Bill 17* (2011)
    Delaware Medical Marijuana Act*
    State of Delaware Medical Marijuana Code*
  •    CAREGIVERSYes

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Delaware

The state of Delaware requires qualifying patients to register for a Medical Marijuana Card prior to using or purchasing cannabis. Patients must be over the age of 18 to register for a card. No registration is available for minors at this time.

How to Register for a Medical Marijuana Card in Delaware

  1. Download and print the Medical Marijuana Patient Application*. The Physician Certification form is included in this document.
  2. Have a Delaware licensed physician fill out the Physician’s Certification included in the application packet.
  3. Fill out the Medical Marijuana Patient Application* and the Patient Release of Medical Information Form(included in the application).
  4. Make a photocopy of your Delaware Driver’s License or Delaware State-Issued ID. You must have one of these forms of identification to qualify for a medical marijuana card. Passports or out-of-state IDs will not be accepted.
  5. If you choose to designate a caregiver, you must fill out the Caregiver Information section of the application. Your caregiver’s application will include a Patient Authorization Form. Fill this form out and return it your caregiver to be mailed with their application. Failure to do so will result in rejection of both your application and your caregiver’s application.
  6. Mail your completed application, Physician’s Certification and release of medical records with a money order or check for $125 made out to State of Delaware, Medical Marijuana Program to:Jesse Cooper Building
    417 Federal Street, Suite 205
    Dover, DE 19901
  7. You will receive a letter of approval or rejection within 45 days. If your application is accepted, you will be invited to the Division of Public Health’s Dover office to have your photo taken and receive your registration card.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Delaware

The only legal way to obtain marijuana in Delaware is to purchase it from a state-recognized Compassion Center. Delaware law does not allow medical cannabis patients or caregivers to cultivate marijuana. Currently, there is only one licensed distribution center in the state. First State Compassion Center* opened its doors on June 26th, 2015. Visit their website here.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Delaware

Caregivers in Delaware do not grow marijuana for their patients like caregivers in other states. The primary responsibility of a caregiver is to obtain and administer medical marijuana to their patients when needed. In order to become a primary caregiver, your patient must enter your information in the Caregiver Information section of their application form. Then, you can submit a caregiver application separately. If your patient does not include your information in their form, your application will be rejected. Likewise, if your patient includes your information, but you fail to submit an application, your patient’s registration will be rejected.

  1. Before you submit your application, you must first visit the Delaware State Bureau of Identification to request a statewide and nationwide criminal background check. Inform the bureau that you would like the report to be sent to the Delaware Office of Medical Marijuana. Make sure to get a receipt during your visit. You will mail this receipt along with your application.
  2. Download and complete the Medical Marijuana Caregiver Application*.
  3. Have your patient fill out the Patient Authorization Form included in the application.
  4. Make a copy of your birth certificate.
  5. Make a copy of your Delaware Driver’s License or State-Issued ID.
  6. Make sure to include the following documents when you mail your application:
    • Your completed Caregiver Application*
    • A Patient Authorization Form completed by your patient
    • A photocopy of your birth certificate
    • A photocopy of your Delaware Drivers License or State ID
    • Your receipt from the Delaware SBI
    • A money order or check for $125 made out to State of Delaware Medical Marijuana Program
  7. Mail all required documents to:Jesse Cooper Building
    417 Federal Street, Suite 205
    Dover, DE 19901
  8. You will receive a letter of approval or rejection within 45 days. If your application is accepted, you will be invited to the Division of Public Health’s Dover office to have your photo taken and receive your registration card.

Caregivers are permitted to have five patients or less at any given time

How to Renew Your Delaware Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

The renewal process is very similar to the original registration. You will follow the instructions above to re-submit your patient or caregiver application, simply make sure to check the renewal box included on the application and enter your registration number. You will need to submit new photocopies of your ID and/or birth certificate and a new criminal background check. Registry cards are good for one year or until the expiration date listed on the card. The fee for renewal of a patient or caregiver is $125.

Delaware Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Delaware Patient Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years old

Delaware Caregiver Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You have ever been convicted of an excluded felony offense (see Tile 16*, Chapter 49A for details)

Forms and Resources

Delaware

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2011

New Jersey residents have the option of registering for a medical marijuana card if they have a debilitating medical condition. Unlike other states, New Jersey does offer assistance in finding a physician for certification. Also, New Jersey medical marijuana ID cards are valid for two years instead of one, as long as the patient maintains a relationship with his/her qualifying doctor. If you are a New Jersey resident, take a look at the resources below to see if you qualify for a medical marijuana card.

In New Jersey, unlawful personal use or possession of 50 grams or less of marijuana is considered disorderly conduct and is punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and/or 6 months in prison. Possession of more than one ounce of marijuana is a crime punishable by 1.5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $25,000. Possession of any amount of marijuana with intent to distribute is a crime punishable by 1.5 to 20 years in prison and fines of up to $300,000 (depending on the amount). Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to a 30-day supply of cannabis, or a maximum of 2 ounces. Read the New Jersey Compassionate Use Act* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    ALS
    AIDS
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Muscular Dystrophy
    IBS or Crohn’s Disease
    Intractable Skeletal Muscular Spasticity
    HIV/AIDS
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Severe Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizure Disorders
    Any illness with a prognosis of less than 12 months of life

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2 ounces per 30-day period

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes, calle

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    NJ Compassionate Use Act*
    CUMMA Amendments*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

New Jersey Medical Marijuana Card

The state of New Jersey does allow patients with qualifying medical conditions to register for a Medical Marijuana ID card. This gives them the right to obtain and use marijuana from an Alternative Treatment Center (ATC). We’ve outlined the steps to acquiring a card below. Check with the NJ DOH here. Medical marijuana cards are good for two years or until the expiration date listed on the card. New Jersey requires patients to use state dispensaries (called ATCs) and you must specify one during your registration process.  Please note: your doctor is allowed to submit up to a 90-day effective period for your medical marijuana recommendation. By law, he/she is required to re-evaluate you at the end of each 30-90 day session. To maintain a valid registration, you must be re-evaluated by your doctor at the end of every effective period.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in New Jersey

  1. Before you can register as a Medical Marijuana Patient in New Jersey, you must get a physician’s certification from a doctor. New Jersey’s Department of Health keeps a database of all registered physicians who are participating in the Medical Marijuana Program. You can view the list of physicians here. Your doctor must log into the system and create a certification form which will contain your reference number. This number is required in order to fill out a patient registration.
  2. Once you have received a reference number from your doctor, you can log into the online system and fill out your patient registration. Before you begin, make sure that you have the following documents saved to your computer:
    • A copy of your government-issued ID
    • Proof of NJ residency (utility bill, tax statement, bank statement…etc)
    • A passport-style photograph of yourself (see photo requirements here)
    • If you are designating a caregiver, you will need a copy of each of the above documents for your caregiver as well.
  3. Go to the NJ MMP website here to fill out your new patient registration. You will need a personal e-mail address to receive confirmation.
    • For Minors: minor applicants will follow the same registration process, but a parent/legal guardian must register as the child’s caregiver. The caregiver application fee is waived for parent/legal guardian registration.
  4. Once you have completed your registration, your application will be reviewed and you will receive a confirmation e-mail. Follow the link in this e-mail to submit payment. The fee for each new patient or caregiver is $200. You will need a credit or debit card to submit payment online. You may qualify for a reduced fee of $20 if you are currently receiving government assistance. See the list of approved programs here.
  5. If you designate a caregiver, he/she must complete a fingerprint background check before your application will be approved. See caregiver instructions below for more details.
  6. You will receive a transaction confirmation number on the last page of your payment. Save this number for future reference. Your ID card will be mailed to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in New Jersey

New Jersey does not allow patients or caregivers to cultivate cannabis. Dispensaries are called Alternative Treatment Centers (ATCs). When a patient registers, he/she must designate an ATC. This is the only ATC you are permitted to purchase marijuana from. You can change your designated ATC by visiting the NJ MMP website and selecting Change ATC/View ATC Visits.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in New Jersey

In New Jersey, each caregiver can have only one patient and each patient can have only one caregiver. Caregivers are not permitted to grow marijuana. The caregiver is responsible for obtaining, delivering and administering marijuana to his/her designated patient.

  1. In order to become a caregiver in New Jersey, a patient must designate you as his/her caregiver during the application process. Make sure that your patient has the following documents prior to filling out the online application:
    • A copy of your government-issued ID
    • Proof of NJ residency (utility bill, tax statement, bank statement…etc)
    • A passport-style photograph of yourself (see photo requirements here)
  2. You patient must scan these documents into his/her computer and upload them during the patient registration.
  3. Once registration is complete, you must submit to a fingerprint background check. When the online registration is complete, your patient will receive a Caregiver Criminal Background Check Form. Print and fill out this form, then follow the instructions.
  4. Once your background check is complete and approved, you will receive an e-mail. Follow the link in this e-mail to submit payment. The fee for each new patient or caregiver is $200. You will need a credit or debit card to submit payment online. You may qualify for a reduced fee of $20 if you are currently receiving government assistance. See the list of approved programs here.
  5. You will receive a transaction confirmation number on the last page of your payment. Save this number for future reference. Your ID card will be mailed to you.

How to Renew Your New Jersey Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Medical Marijuana ID cards in New Jersey are good for two years. When your card is nearing expiration, you will receive an e-mail from the NJ DOH. Follow the link in this e-mail to apply for renewal. You may need to acquire a new physician’s certification before renewal. Follow the instructions in your e-mail to ensure you have all the necessary paperwork. New Jersey does not charge a fee to renew, but you do need to resubmit a photograph, proof of residency and government issued ID. Caregivers do not need to submit new fingerprints, but a $22 fee is charged for a new criminal background check.

Please note: your doctor is allowed to submit up to a 90-day effective period for your medical marijuana recommendation. By law, he/she is required to re-evaluate you at the end of each 30-90 day session. To maintain a valid registration, you must be re-evaluated by your doctor at the end of every effective period. Failure to do so may result in an early termination of your patient status. An in-person visit days may not be required to re-evaluate you. Ask your doctor about his/her method of re-evaluation during your initial visit.

New Jersey Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years old
  • You are currently a caregiver for another patient
  • You are the patient’s physician
  • You have ever been convicted of a drug-related offense

Forms and Resources

New Jersey

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2010

In 2012, Connecticut joined the ranks of pot-friendly states by approving their Medical Marijuana Act, but it’s much more conservative than the laws adopted in other states. It includes a broad range of qualifying conditions, but patients and caregivers have less freedom in choosing how they acquire cannabis. Home cultivation is still illegal, even for patients, and caregivers can only be registered if a physician indicates the need for a caregiver. There are currently only six licensed dispensaries in the state, and patients must buy their marijuana from one of these facilities. However, there is no concrete possession limit for medical marijuana patients. The law states that a patient or caregiver can carry up to a one-month supply at a time.

In Connecticut, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1/2oz of marijuana is a civil penalty punishable by fines of up to $150 or $500 for a repeat offense. Possession of 1/2oz to 4oz of marijuana is a civil penalty punishable by up to 1 year in prison and $1,000 in fines (more for subsequent offenses). Personal use or possession of more than 4oz of cannabis is a felony resulting in up to 10 years incarceration and $5,000 in fines. Possession or cultivation with intent to distribute is a felony that may result in up to 25 years in prison and $100,000 in fines. Medical marijuana patients and caregivers are legally permitted to carry “an amount of usable marijuana reasonably necessary to ensure uninterrupted availability for a period of one month, as determined by the Department of Consumer Protection.”*

* See HB 5389 for more details.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cancer
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Crohn’s Disease
    Chronic Pain
    Epilepsy
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Nausea
    Parkinson’s Disease
    PTSD
    Seizures
    Severe or Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity”

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    One month supply – an amount of usable marijuana reasonably necessary to ensure uninterrupted availability for a period of one month, as determined by the Department of Consumer Protection.

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    No

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    House Bill 5839* (2012)
    Draft Regulations on Medical Marijuana*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, only if recommended by your physician

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Connecticut

The state of Connecticut requires qualifying patients to register for a Medical Marijuana Card prior to using or purchasing cannabis. Unlike other states, the application process must be initiated by your physician. You will be contacted by e-mail once your doctor has completed his/her portion of the Online Application*. Patients must be over the age of 18 to register for a medical marijuana card. No registration is available for minors at this time.

How to Register for a Medical Marijuana Card in Connecticut

  1. Make an appointment with you physician. Your doctor must initiate the registration process online via the Online Application Page* on the Connecticut DCP website before you can apply for your medical marijuana card. Make sure to give your doctor the following information:
    • A valid e-mail address that you are comfortable using for your registration
    • Your primary telephone number
  2. You will be contacted by the Department of Consumer Protection to complete        your online application. Before you apply online, make sure you have the following:
    • Proof of Identity (examples are available here).
    • Proof of residency (see the list of approved documents here).
    • A current passport-sized photograph (see photograph requirements here).
    • Your $100 registration fee. Checks should be made out to Treasurer, State of CT
    • You will be able to upload these documents during your online application, or you can mail them to the department after your application is complete. If you choose to mail your documentation, send it to the address provided during the application process.
  3. Complete your Online Application.
  4. If your physician indicates a need for you to have a primary caregiver, this person   must complete the Online Caregiver Application before your registration can be     completed. If you need a caregiver, be sure to register them during your              application process. They will be contacted to complete their portion.
  5. Your application will be processed and approved or denied. You will receive your Medical Marijuana Card by mail if you are approved.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Connecticut

Connecticut law does not allow medical cannabis patients or caregivers to cultivate marijuana. Only licensed pharmacists are permitted to obtain a dispensary license and grow marijuana. As a patient or caregiver, you must purchase medical marijuana from a dispensary. The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection can assist you in finding a dispensary once you complete your registration.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Connecticut

Caregivers in Connecticut do not grow marijuana for their patients like caregivers in other states. The primary responsibility of a caregiver is to obtain and administer medical marijuana to their patients when needed. In order to become a primary caregiver, your patient must first register with the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection. If a patient’s doctor indicates the need for a caregiver, a patient can provide your information during their Online Application. You will then be contacted via e-mail to complete your portion. Once you have been contacted, follow these steps to register:

  1. Before you apply online, make sure you have the following:
    • Proof of Identity (examples are available here).
    • A current passport-sized photograph (see photograph requirements here).
    • Your $25 registration fee. Checks should be made out to Treasurer, State of CT
    • You will be able to upload these documents during your online application, or you can mail them to the department after your application is complete. If you choose to mail your documentation, send it to the address provided during the application process.
  2. Complete your Online Application.
  3. Your application will be processed and approved or denied. You will receive your Medical Marijuana Caregiver Card by mail if you are approved.

Caregivers are only permitted to have more then one patient if they are a parent, guardian, conservator or sibling of ALL the patients they care for.

How to Renew Your Connecticut Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

The renewal process is very similar to the original registration. You and your doctor will be contacted prior to the expiration date on your medical marijuana card. Your doctor will need to log into the system and update or confirm the information he/she provided during the first application. You will then log into the system and confirm or update your personal information. Caregivers must also renew via the online system. Both patients and caregivers must submit an updated photograph. The fee for renewal is $100 for patients or $25 for caregivers.

Connecticut Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Connecticut Patient Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years old
  • You are a current inmate of a correctional institution or a facility that is under the supervision of the Department of Correction

Connecticut Caregiver Registration is not available if:

  • You are under 18 years old
  • You are the patient’s physician
  • You have ever been convicted of a drug-related violation (misdemeanor or felony)
  • If the patient lacks legal capacity, you must be the patient’s parent, guardian or legal custodian

Forms and Resources

Connecticut

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2012

Rhode Island passed its Medical Marijuana Act in 2006. Residents with debilitating conditions can apply and register as medical marijuana patients. The state has a non-profit dispensary system for convenience, or patients can choose cultivate cannabis at home. Rhode Island medical cannabis cards are good for one year. If you or someone you know lives in Rhode Island and has a debilitating medical condition, read on to understand your rights.

In Rhode Island, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana is a civil violation punishable by a fine of up to $150. Possession of more than 1 ounce, but less than 1kg of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in jail and a maximum fine of $500. Possession of more than 1kg with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 10 years to life in prison and a maximum fine of $500,000. Medical marijuana patients can legally carry up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana. Read The Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    HIV/AIDS
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Hepatitis C
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Severe, Debilitating, Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent muscle spasms
    Epilepsy
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2.5 ounces per patient and caregivers cannot possess more than 5 ounces total

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 12 plants per patient OR 24 plants total

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    The Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act*
    Senate Bill 0710 (2006)*
    House Bill 5359 (2009)*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, parent or legal guardian must register if the patient is under 18

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Rhode Island

  1. Download and print the Instructions and Application for Initial Registration as a Medical Marijuana Patient*. All required forms are included in this packet.
  2. Have your doctor fill out the Practitioner Form.
  3. Fill out and sign the Patient Form.
    • If the patient is a minor, a parent or legal guardian must fill out the Minor Form and register as the patient’s caregiver.
  4. Decide who you will designate as your caregiver. Rhode Island allows each patient to have up to 2 caregivers. A caregiver may be either a person or a Compassion Center (dispensary).
  5. If you are designating a person as your caregiver, fill out the Natural Person Caregiver-Initial Application. You caregiver must complete a National Criminal Records Check using the form included before he/she can become a registered caregiver.
  6. If you are designating a Compassion Center as your caregiver, fill out the Compassion Center Caregiver-Initial Application.
  7. Make a copy of your Rhode Island Driver’s License or State ID as proof of residency. If you don’t have either of those, a copy of your gas or utility bill is acceptable.
  8. Include a check or money order for the following amounts:
    • $100 patient registration fee (see application for reduced fee eligibility)
    • $200 for each Natural Person Caregiver (see application for reduced fee eligibility)
    • No additional fee is required to designate a Compassion Center Caregiver
  9. Include all of the documents listed above and your check or money order. Mail the completed application to:Rhode Island
    Office of Health Professionals Regulation
    Medical Marijauna Program
    Room 104 – 3 Capitol Hill
    Providence, RI 02908-5097
  10. Your application will take 4-6 weeks to process. Once approved, you will receive a letter with instructions on how to have your photograph taken for your medical marijuana card.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Rhode Island

Rhode Island allows patients to choose between state dispensaries or home cultivation of marijuana. As a patient, you are permitted to grow up to 12 plants at home, or you can designate up to 2 caregivers to grow for you. If you designate a caregiver or caregivers, the number of plants between you cannot exceed a total of 12 per patient.

State dispensaries in Rhode Island are called Compassion Centers. If you choose to use a Compassion Center, you may designate up to 2 on your application form. You are only permitted to visit Compassion Centers if you have designated them.

If you choose to use a caregiver or Compassion Center to acquire marijuana, you must submit the correct documentation with your application. For each caregiver, fill out the Natural Person Caregiver- Initial Application form. Each caregiver must also submit to a National Background Check. If you are using a Compassion Center, fill out the Compassion Center Caregiver-Initial Application form. There is space on this form for 2 Compassion Centers if you choose to use them. The total number of Natural Person Caregivers and Compassion Centers cannot exceed 2.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Rhode Island

If you choose to become a medical marijuana caregiver in Rhode Island, make sure that your patient fills out the Natural Person Caregiver-Initial Application form. This form should be mailed along with the patient’s application and a $200 caregiver registration fee. You may be eligible for a reduced fee if you are accepting government assistance; see the application packet for more details. In addition to the caregiver application form, you must submit to a National Criminal Records Check. The form for submitting a background check is included with the patient application. You will take this form to your local Police Department, Attorney General, or State Police station to have your fingerprints taken. A copy of your background check will be mailed to the Rhode Island DOH and you will receive a copy in the mail. Once your application is approved, you will be sent a letter inviting you to have your picture taken for your ID card.

How to Renew Your Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Rhode Island medical cannabis cards are good for one year or until the expiration date on the card. The Rhode Island Department of Health will send you a letter 60 days before your card expires. This letter will include a renewal application and instructions for obtaining a new card.

Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You have ever been convicted of a felony
  • You are already a caregiver to 5 patients

Forms and Resources

Rhode Island

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2006

Residents of Massachusetts may be confused about whether or not they qualify for medical marijuana. The application process varies from state to state, so it’s a good idea learn about the laws and regulations before you apply. In 2013, the Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Statute* went into effect, which allows patients with qualifying conditions to register with the state and obtain a Program ID Card (or medical marijuana card). Once you have a physician’s certification, you can fill out the online patient and caregiver applications by following the instructions below. If you think you may qualify for the Massachusetts medical marijuana program, read on to understand your rights.

In Massachusetts, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a civil penalty punishable by a fine of up to $100. Possession of more than 1 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in prison and fines of up to $500. A second offense is punishable by up to 2 years imprisonment and fines of up to $2000. Possession of any amount over one pound is punishable by up to 2 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $5,000. Commercial promotion or distribution  is a felony punishable by a maximum of 15 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $200,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry a 2-month supply  of cannabis. Read the Implementation of an Act for the Humanitarian Use of Marijuana* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Parkinson’s Disease
    Multiple Sclerosis

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    60 day supply up to 10 ounces, unless otherwise documented by your physician.

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, but only if the patient qualifies for a hardship cultivation registration

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Implementation of an Act for the Humanitarian Use of Marijuana*
    Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Statute*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Massachusetts

  1. Before you can fill out the online application, you must be certified by a qualified physician. Make an appointment with your doctor so that he/she can enter your information through the physician’s webpage. You will receive an e-mail from the Massachusetts EOHHS containing a PIN number and a link that you will use for your online application. Find a medical marijuana doctor here(no link).
  2. Download and read How To Register with the Medical Use of Marijuana Program: Instructions for Patients*.
  3. Make sure you have your Massachusetts Driver’s License or State ID. You can also use a Military ID or Passport and a document that verifies your residency (such as vehicle registration, utility bill, lease agreement or bank statement-see the Instructions for Patients* form for more information). This identification will need to be scanned and uploaded during the application process.
  4. Obtain a passport photograph of yourself or a photograph that meets the requirements listed on the Instructions for Patients* form.  This picture must be scanned onto your computer and uploaded during the registration process.
  5. When you fill out the online application, you will first need to create a Virtual Gateway account through the Massachusetts EOHHS. Once you have created a Virtual Gateway account, you can then login to the MMJ Online System.
  6. Complete your patient registration through the MMJ Online System. You will be instructed to upload your proof of identification and photograph during this process. Please Note: you can use the back button during your application, but the online system will time out after 30 minutes, so make sure that you have all the documents you need prior to applying.
  7. The fee for registration is $50. You will need to pay with a credit card, debit card, or a bank account and routing number. You may qualify for a reduced fee if you can demonstrate financial hardship. See Instructions for Patients* for more information.
  8. Once your registration is complete, the Massachusetts EOHHS will review it. If approved, you will receive a Temporary Paper Program ID Card via e-mail which is good for four weeks. You should receive your plastic Program ID Card in the mail before the paper ID expires.

Selecting a Caregiver

If you choose to select a caregiver, you must register them using the online system. You must log into the Virtual Gateway and select “My Caregivers” at the top of the screen. You will need to generate a PIN number and have it e-mailed to your caregiver. Your caregiver will complete the caregiver registration, and you must log back into the Virtual Gateway to confirm your consent to allow that person to act as your caregiver. Patients in Massachusetts are allowed to designate up to 2 caregivers.

Minor Patients

Minor qualifying patients will follow the same procedures listed above, but a parent or legal guardian must consent to allow the minor’s use of marijuana. In addition, minors must be certified by two licensed physicians, and at least one of those physicians must be a pediatrician or pediatric sub-specialist. In Massachusetts, minor patients must have a “debilitating, life-limiting illness” to qualify for medical marijuana. The law defines a life-limiting illness as “a debilitating medical condition that does not respond to curative treatments, where reasonable estimates of prognosis suggest death may occur within two years.”

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Massachusetts

Massachusetts only allows patients to cultivate marijuana if they can demonstrate that they have no dispensaries within a reasonable distance, an inability to travel to a dispensary or financial hardship that prevents them from purchasing marijuana. A patient with a hardship cultivation registration is not permitted to purchase marijuana from a dispensary. If you would like to apply for a hardship cultivation registration, contact the Massachusetts EOHHS at 617-660-5370or via e-mail at medicalmarijuana@state.MA.US.

Currently, there are over 35 state-licensed dispensaries in Massachusetts. When you purchase marijuana from a dispensary, you must provide your Program ID Card and the valid ID that you used when you registered online. Massachusetts does not limit the amount of marijuana a person can purchase from a dispensary, but an individual is not allowed to carry more than a two month supply of marijuana at one time.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Massachusetts

Caregivers in Massachusetts do not do not grow marijuana for their patients unless a patient has a hardship cultivation registration. A caregiver is responsible for transporting, administering and preparing cannabis for their designated patient. Caregivers are only allowed to assist one patient at a time.

  1. Before you can register as a caregiver, your patient must assign you a PIN number, which will be e-mailed to you along with a link that you will use to access the online system.
  2. Download and read How To Register with the Medical Use of Marijuana Program: Instructions for Caregivers*.
  3. Make sure you have your Massachusetts Driver’s License or State ID. You can also use a Military ID or Passport and a document that verifies your residency (such as vehicle registration, utility bill, lease agreement or bank statement-see the Instructions for Caregivers* form for more information). This identification will need to be scanned and uploaded during the application process.
  4. Obtain a passport photograph of yourself or a photograph that meets the requirements listed on the Instructions for Caregivers* form.  This picture must be scanned onto your computer and uploaded during the registration process.
  5. When you fill out the online application, you will first need to create a Virtual Gateway account through the Massachusetts EOHHS. Once you have created A Virtual Gateway account, you can then login to the MMJ Online System.
  6. Complete your caregiver registration through the MMJ Online System. You will be instructed to upload your proof of identification and photograph during this process. Please Note: you can use the back button during your application, but the online system will time out after 30 minutes, so make sure that you have all the documents you need prior to applying.  There is no application fee for registered caregivers.
  7. Once you have completed your registration, notify your patient so that he/she can verify your status as caregiver.
  8. Once your registration is complete, the Massachusetts EOHHS will review it. If approved, you will receive a Temporary Paper Program ID Card via e-mail which is good for four weeks. You should receive your plastic Program ID Card in the mail before the paper ID expires.

How to Renew Your Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

To renew your Program ID Card, simply repeat the steps listed above a minimum of 60 days before the expiration date on your card. Medical marijuana cards in Massachusetts are good for one year or until the date listed on the card. Both patient and caregiver must maintain a valid registration at all times.

Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Registered caregivers in the state of Massachusetts must be at least 21 years old.

Massachusetts

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2013

The state of Pennsylvania is well on its way to legalizing medical marijuana. Although medical cannabis is not yet legal for patients, the Pennsylvania house is currently revising House Bill 1432*, which would legalize marijuana for patients with debilitating conditions. In May of 2015, Senate Bill 3* passed by a vote of 40-7 in favor of legalizing medical marijuana. Pennsylvania residents are hoping that HB 1432* passes before the legislative session ends this summer. The bill does not allow patients to grow their own marijuana, but instead sets up a dispensary system that would be accessible only to patients with a registry ID card. Possession limits have not been set yet, but the details will be available once the bill leaves committee.

If you live in Pennsylvania and want to help change your state’s policies on Medical Marijuana, please consider supporting House Bill 1432*. You can also get involved nationally through Americans for Safe Access, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), or the Drug Policy Alliance. Medical Marijuana can be used as a safer alternative to prescription drugs, but only if we legalize it.

In Pennsylvania, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 30 grams of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in prison and a fine of up to $500. Possession of more than 30 grams of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and fines of up to $5000. Sale or distribution of 2-10 pounds of marijuana is a felony punishable by 1 year in prison and/or a fine of up to $5,000. Sale or distribution of more than 10 pounds of marijuana is a felony worth up to 10 years in prison and fines of up to $100,000. Read Pennsylvania Code Ch. 303* for more information.

Pennsylvania

Status: Inactive

New York residents can celebrate the advance of a new medical cannabis program in their state. On July 5th, 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the New York Compassionate Care Act* into law. The act gives the state 18 months to establish a dispensary system and begin issuing registry cards to qualifying patients. The New York State Medical Marijuana Program should be operational by January of 2016. Currently, the state is accepting applications from dispensary organizations. There are some big differences between New York’s medical marijuana laws and those in other states. The Compassionate Care Act* does not approve smoking as a legal method of delivery, so the majority of cannabis will likely be in the form of oils, liquids and pills. Patients and caregivers are not allowed to grow marijuana under the new law, and all purchased marijuana must remain in it’s original packaging to be considered legal. Certified physicians will be required to make dosage recommendations and patient possession will be limited to a 30-day supply.

The following conditions have been approved for medical cannabis treatment: Cancer, HIV/AIDS, ALS, Epilepsy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Neuropathy, Huntington’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or Spinal Cord Injury with Spasticity. The law also allows cannabis use for any condition or treatment that produces one or more of the following symptoms: Cachexia, Wasting Syndrome, Severe or Chronic Pain, Severe Nausea, Seizures, or Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms.

In New York, unlawful personal use or possession of less than 25 grams of marijuana is punishable by a fine of up to $100. A second offense is punishable by a fine of up to $200. Possession of 25 grams to 2 ounces of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 3 months in jail and a maximum fine of $500. Possession of 2-8ounces is a misdemeanor worth up to 1 year in prison and a maximum fine or $1000. Possession of more than 8 ounces is a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a maximum fine of $15,000. Sale or intent to distribute cannabis is a felony punishable by up to 15 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $15,000 (depending on the amount sold).

New York

Status: Limited

Vermont passed it’s Medical Marijuana Act in 2007. The law currently allows patients and caregivers to register with the state and possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana at a time. Home cultivation and state dispensaries are available for registered patients. If you live in Vermont and you think you may qualify for a Medical Marijuana card, read on to understand your rights.

In Vermont, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a civil violation punishable by a fine of $200. A second offense is punishable by a fine of up to $300. Possession of 1-2 ounces is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 6 months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $500. Subsequent offenses are punishable by up to 2 years in prison and fines of up to $2000. Possession of more than 2 ounces is a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison and fines of up to $500,000 (depending on the amount). Sale or distribution of less than 1/2 ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor worth up to 2 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. Sale or distribution of 1/2 ounce to 1 pound is a felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and fines of up to $100,000. Sale of more than 1 pound of marijuana is a felony worth fines of up to $1,000,000 and 30 years in prison. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to two ounces of cannabis. Read Vermont Statutes, Title 18, Chapter 36* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cancer
    HIV/AIDS
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Severe Pain
    Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe or Persistent Muscle Spasms

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 2 mature plants and 7 immature plants

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Vermont Statutes, Title 18, Chapter 36*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Vermont

  1. Download and print the Registered Patient Application*.
  2. Complete all required sections of the form and initial all acknowledgements. Fill out the section for Initial Patient ApplicantsThis form must be notarized.
    • If the patient is a minor, both the patient and a parent/legal guardian must sign this form. In addition, a parent/legal guardian must register as the patient’s caregiver.
  3. Have your doctor fill out the Health Care Professional Verification Form*.
  4. If you choose a caregiver, have him/her fill out the Registered Caregiver Designation section of the application.
  5. Obtain an electronic photograph of yourself and mail it on a CD or e-mail it to: DPS.VTMR@state.vt.us
  6. Obtain a check or money order for the $50 patient registration fee and $50 for each caregiver. Make checks payable to Department of Public Safety.
  7. Mail all of the above documents, and your check or money order to:State of Vermont
    Marijuana Registry
    103 South Main Street
    Waterbury, Vermont 05671-2101
  8. The Vermont Marijuana Registry will approve or deny your application within 30 days. If approved, you will receive your registry ID card in the mail.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Vermont

Patients in Vermont can choose either home cultivation or a state dispensary to acquire medical cannabis. If you choose home cultivation, you cannot purchase marijuana from a dispensary, and vice versa. The Registered Patient Application* contains a section on procurement. You must select one method of procurement and use only this method. If you choose to grow cannabis, you may have up to 2 mature marijuana plants and 7 immature plants in a secure, indoor facility at any one time. The address of your grow site must be listed on your application. Patients are not permitted to have more than 2 ounces of useable marijuana in their possession. If you choose to use a dispensary, see the list of state-licensed dispensaries here.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Vermont

If you choose to become a medical marijuana caregiver in Vermont, please keep in mind that each patient can have only one caregiver and each caregiver can have only one patient. All caregivers must submit to a criminal background check. If you choose to cultivate cannabis for your patient, you are permitted to have up to 2 mature plants and 7 immature plants at any given time. Minor patients are allowed to have up to 2 caregivers. We’ve outlined the steps for becoming a caregiver below.

  1. Fill out the Registered Caregiver Designation section of your patient’s application. Make sure to initial all acknowledgements and sign the release form.
  2. Obtain a digital photograph of yourself and mail it on a CD with your patient’s application or e-mail it to DPS.VTMR@state.vt.us
  3. Return all forms and digital pictures to your patient to be mailed to the Vermont Marijuana Registry.
  4. If you are registering a second caregiver for a minor patient, download a second Registered Caregiver Application* and submit it with the patient’s application.
  5. The Vermont Marijuana Registry will approve or deny your application within 30 days. If approved, you will receive your registry ID card in the mail.

How to Renew Your Vermont Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Registry ID cards in Vermont are good for one year or until the expiration date printed on the card. To renew your Vermont registry ID card or caregiver card, resubmit the Registered Patient Application*. Fill out all sections of the form for renewal applicants and resubmit a $50 registration fee for the patient and each caregiver. Submit a new digital photograph on a CD or via e-mail. Renewal applications do not need to be notarized.

Vermont Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years old
  • You are a registered medical cannabis patient
  • You have ever been convicted of a drug-related crime
  • You are already the designated caregiver for another medical cannabis patient

Forms and Resources

Vermont

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2007

New Hampshire residents can look forward to a medical marijuana registration system in the near future. On July 23rd, 2013, Governor Maggie Hassan signed HB 573* (RSA 126-X) into law, which allows for the development of a medical cannabis registry system. It is called the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis Program* and is still in it’s early stages of development. The law does not allow patients or caregivers to cultivate marijuana, so New Hampshire is currently creating a dispensary system for medical cannabis. Unfortunately, the state is not accepting patient or caregiver applications at this time. They are, however, working with newly approved Alternative Treatment Centers. Once the Alternative Treatment Centers are operational, the state will begin accepting patient and caregiver applications.  The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services expects to open patient registration in early 2016.

The following conditions have been approved for medical cannabis treatment: Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, ALS, Muscular Dystrophy, Crohn’s Disease, Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Pancreatitis, Spinal Cord Injury or Disease, or Traumatic Brain Injury. The law also allows cannabis use for any condition or treatment that produces one or more of the following symptoms: Elevated Intraocular Pressure, Cachexia, Chemotherapy Induced Anorexia, Wasting Syndrome, Severe Pain, Severe Nausea, Moderate to Severe Vomiting, Seizures, or Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms.

In New Hampshire, unlawful personal use or possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000. Possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 3 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $25,000. Possession of more than one ounce but less than 5lbs of marijuana with intent to distribute is a felony punishable by up to 7 years in prison and fines of up to $100,000. Possession of more then 5lbs of cannabis with intent to distribute is a felony worth up to 20 years imprisonment and fines up to $300,000. Registered medical marijuana patients will be lawfully permitted to carry up to 2 ounces of cannabis. Read Medical Use of Marijuana Chapter 453A* for more information.

  •    QUALIFYING CONDITIONSALS
    Alzheimer’s disease
    Cachexia
    Cancer
    Chemotherapy induced anorexia
    Chronic pancreatitis
    Crohn’s disease
    Elevated intraocular pressure
    Epilepsy
    Glaucoma
    Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment)
    HIV/AIDS
    Lupus
    Moderate to severe vomiting
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Muscular Dystrophy
    Nausea
    Parkinson’s disease
    Persistent muscle spasms
    Seizures
    Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication)
    Spinal cord injury or disease
    Traumatic brain injury
    Wasting syndrome
  •    PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2 ounces of usable cannabis and any amount of unusable cannabis.

  •    HOME CULTIVATION

    No, medical marijuana is only aviable from three Alternative Treatment Centers statewide.

  •    STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes but no more than 4 for the entire state.

  •    MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTESNH Controlled Drug Act
    RSA 126-X (HB 573)
    Therapeutic Cannabis Program Registry Rules
  •    CAREGIVERSYes

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in New Hampshire

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in New Hampshire (Adults)

  1. Visit the New Hampshire Department of Health And Human Services* website and review the Qualifying Patient Information Sheet* and Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* form.
  2. Have a physician or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) licensed in the state of New Hampshire complete the Written Certification for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis Form*. Once your healtcare provider returns the written certification to you, you will have 60 days from the date on the form to complete your application.
  3. Obtain a digital photgraph of your face, a passport photo is preferred (maximum 30 days old). See the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  4. Enclose a check or money order made payable to “Treasure, State of New Hampshire” in the amount of $50.
  5. You must be a resident of New Hampshire and submit proof of residency with your application. Originals are not required however the copies of the originals msut be legible. See the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* for a list of acceptable documents.
  6. Fill out the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* online, save it to your computer, print it and sign it.
  7. Assemble the completed packet consiting of:
    • Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* form
    • Written Certification (Step 2)
    • Your photo (Step 3)
    • Check or money order (Step 4)
    • Proof of residency (Step 5)
  8. Mail or hand deliver the completed packet to:NH Department of Health and Human Services
    Therapeutic Cannabis Program
    129 Pleasant Street, Brown Building
    Concord, NH 03301

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in New Hampshire (Minors)

  1. Visit the New Hampshire Department of Health And Human Services* website and review the Minor Qualifying Patient Information Sheet* and Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* form.
  2. The application must be completed by the minor’s custodial parent or legal guardian on behalf of the appllicant. The custodial parent or legal guardian must be approved by the Program as the minor’s Designated Caregiver or the application will not be approved. See Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* form for more information.
  3. Have two seperate healthcare providers, one MUST be a pediatrician, each complete seperate Written Certification for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis Form*. Once your healtcare providers return the written certifications to you, you will have 60 days from the date on the forms to complete your application.
  4. Obtain a digital photgraph of your face, a passport photo is preferred (maximum 30 days old). See the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  5. Enclose a check or money order made payable to “Treasure, State of New Hampshire” in the amount of $50.
  6. Your custodial parent or legal guardian must be a resident of New Hampshire and submit proof of residency with your application. Originals are not required however the copies of the originals msut be legible. See the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* for a list of acceptable documents.
  7. Fill out the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* online, save it to your computer, print it and sign it.
  8. Assemble the completed packet consiting of:
    • Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Qualifying Patient* form
    • Written Certifications (Step 3)
    • A photo (Step 4)
    • Check or money order (Step 5)
    • Proof of residency (Step 6)
  9. Mail or hand deliver the completed packet to:NH Department of Health and Human Services
    Therapeutic Cannabis Program
    129 Pleasant Street, Brown Building
    Concord, NH 03301

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in New Hampshire

Home cultivation is not allowed in New Hampshire, you can only obtain cannabis from three Alternative Treatment Centers (ATC) operating in four locations statewide. You will need to pick an ATC when you fill out your application and you will only purchase medical marijuan from that location unless you change it. To change your ATC you will need to fill out the Change of Information/Lost Card* and it will take up to 10 days to become effective. Here are the Alternative Treatment Centers:

  • Temescal Wellness, Inc., with dispensaries located in Dover and Lebanon
    367 Route 120
    Unit E-2
    Lebanon, NH 03766

    26 Crosby Road
    Units 11-12
    Dover, NH, 03820
    Email: info@temescalwellness.com
    Phone: (603) 285-9383
    Note: The Dover and Lebanon dispensaries are separate ATCs.
    Selecting one does not allow a Qualifying Patient to utilize the other location.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in New Hampshire

  1. Visit the New Hampshire Department of Health And Human Services* website and review the Designated Caregiver Information Sheet* and Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* form.
  2. Obtain a digital photgraph of your face, a passport photo is preferred (maximum 30 days old). See the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* for more details on file type and image requirements.
  3. Enclose a check or money order made payable to “Treasure, State of New Hampshire” in the amount of $50.
  4. For the initial application you will need to have the results of a criminal history records check released to the Program. See the Criminal History Record Authorization – Therapeutic Cannabis* form and Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* form for more information.
  5. For renewals a criminal records check is not required as long as your registration did not lapse. Simply submit a signed Designated Caregiver’s Attestation of Felony Conviction.
  6. Fill out the Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* online, save it to your computer, print it and sign it.
  7. Assemble the completed packet consiting of:
    • Application for the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis – Designated Caregiver* form
    • Your photo (Step 2)
    • Check or money order (Step 3)
  8. Mail or hand deliver the completed packet to:NH Department of Health and Human Services
    Therapeutic Cannabis Program
    129 Pleasant Street, Brown Building
    Concord, NH 03301

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

New Hampshire

Status: Limited

Maine was one of the first states to pass legislation that allows patients with qualifying medical conditions to use and grow marijuana. In 1999, the Maine Medical Marijuana Act* was passed, creating a framework for the state’s current medical cannabis system. Starting in 2015, all medical marijuana patients must register with the state prior to using or growing pot. The state has set up a simple system which allows doctors to register patients and print medical marijuana cards on the same day. More paperwork is required if patients choose to grow cannabis or purchase it from a dispensary. We’ve outlined the steps to acquiring a medical marijuana card and becoming a caregiver below.

In Maine, unlawful personal use or possession of 2.5 ounces or less of marijuana is a civil violation punishable by a fine of up to $1000. Possession of more than 2.5 ounces is a crime punishable by a maximum of 10 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $20,000 (depending on the amount). Possession of less than 20lbs. of marijuana with intent to distribute is punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $5,000. Possession of more then 20lbs of marijuana with intent to distribute is a crime punishable by up to 10 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $20,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. Read the Maine Marijuana Act* for more information.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cancer
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Chronic Intractable Pain
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s
    Nail-patella Syndrome
    Nausea
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Seizures
    Severe or Persistent Muscle Spasms

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2.5 ounces

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 mature plants and 12 immature plants

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Maine Medical Marijuana Act* (1999)

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Maine

If you are a qualifying patient in Maine, getting a medical marijuana card is very simple. You’ll first need to find a physician who is willing to issue a card. Even if you have a qualifying condition, your physician may be unwilling to recommend cannabis, so talk to your doctor before you schedule an appointment. When you go in for your visit, your doctor will log into the Department of Health and Human Services website and enter your information. The process may take up to half an hour, but once your application is complete, your doctor will print your medical marijuana card for you on the same day. Minors may also apply, but a parent or legal guardian must be present to fill out the application for them. The parent or legal guardian of a minor must also apply as that patient’s caregiver.

Only licensed physicians and nurse practitioners in good standing are permitted to create an online account, so your doctor will need to initiate the application process. Before your appointment, check to see what paperwork or identification you will need to bring- your doctor may already have this on file, or you may need to provide it for him/her. After your card is issued, you will need to take the following steps to acquire marijuana legally:

  1. Print and fill out a Designation Form*. This form is used to either designate a dispensary or caregiver to provide you with marijuana.
  2. Make a photocopy of your Maine Driver’s License or State ID.
  3. Have your caregiver or a dispensary representative complete and sign the form.
  4. Your caregiver or dispensary will keep this form and the copy of your ID as proof that they are your designated cannabis provider if questioned by law enforcement. If you choose to designate a caregiver, they will also need to fill out a Caregiver Application* (see the section on caregivers below).

There is no fee to register as a medical marijuana patient in Maine, but your doctor may charge a fee for the appointment. Please keep in mind that you must carry your medical marijuana card and a state-issued photo ID with you whenever you are in possession of cannabis.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Maine

Medical marijuana patients in Maine have the option of either using a dispensary or cultivating marijuana as a patient or caregiver. You will need to fill out a Designation Form* (see above) and give that form to your caregiver or dispensary. Medical cannabis laws in Maine allow a you to cultivate up to 6 mature plants per patient, and up to 12 immature plants. If you choose to use pesticides during cultivation, you may also need to apply for a Pesticide Applicator’s License (see the Maine Medical Marijuana website here for more information). All marijuana must be cultivated in an enclosed, locked facility or an enclosed outdoor area. Each plant must possess a label with the patient’s last name printed on it. If you are planning on making edibles, you must apply and meet the requirements for a Food Establishment License.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Maine

Marijuana caregivers in Maine are allowed to assist up to 5 patients at a time. When you apply, you must choose if you will be growing marijuana or just assisting patients in using and acquiring it. If you decide to cultivate marijuana, you must disclose the location on your application. Unless you are working in a nursing facility or hospice, you must pay $31 for a criminal background check. If you choose to grow marijuana, a fee of $240 per patient is required. Patients do not need register as caregivers if they intend to grow cannabis for themselves or another patient in their household.. Follow the steps below to become a registered caregiver in Maine.

  1. Print and fill out a Caregiver Application*.
  2. Make a photocopy of your Maine Driver’s License or State Issued ID.
  3. If you intend to cook with marijuana, you must provide evidence of eligibility as a food establishment.
  4. Enclose a check or money order made out to Treasurer, State of Maine for the following amount:
    • $31 mandatory background check
    • AND $240 per patient if you intend to grow marijuana.
  5. Mail the forms listed above and your check to:Department of Health and Human Services
    Licensing and Regulatory Services
    Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Program
    41 Anthony Ave; 11 State House Station
    Augusta, ME 04333-0011
  6. If your application is accepted, you will receive your caregiver card by mail. Please keep in mind that you must have a designation form from each of your patients prior to growing marijuana.

How to Renew Your Maine Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

All medical marijuana applications must be resubmitted annually. Patients and caregivers will need to repeat the steps listed above every year to maintain their registration. Designation forms must also be renewed each year.

Maine Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver registration is not available if:

  • You are under 21 years of age
  • You have ever been convicted of a disqualifying drug offense (see the Maine Medical Marijuana Act* for more information)

Forms and Resources

Maine

Status: Active

Law Signed: 1999

If you are a citizen of Alaska and over the age of 21, it is now legal to use marijuana and marijuana infused products for medical and non-medical purposes. On February 24th, 2015, Alaska voters passed Ballot Measure 8*, which legalized the use and possession of marijuana for recreational purposes. The state is still developing regulations for the growth and distribution of marijuana, but some basics have been established. Alaska residents over the age of 21 are allowed to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and 6 plants (with a maximum of 3 mature plants). The law bans both smoking and consumption of cannabis in any public place and individuals or patients who are high can still be convicted of a DUI. It is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to possess marijuana unless they are registered patients- patients under the age of 18 can only use the drug with parental supervision. A doctor can still prescribe marijuana, but it is no longer necessary to register with the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services if you are over 21. Laws regarding the medical use of cannabis for minors and young adults are still uncertain, so we recommend that any patients under 21 register with Alaska DHSS until regulations are completed. Take a look at the section on Medical Marijuana in Alaska for more information.

Patients with questions regarding medical marijuana can call (907) 465-5423 for more information.

*Links to full legal documents can be found in our Legal Resources section at the bottom of this page.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cachexia
    Severe Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Any other condition approved by the Department of Health and Social Services

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    One ounce and 6 plants (maximum of 3 mature plants)

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 plants, with a maximum of 3 mature plants

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Ballot Measure 8 (AS 17.37.010)**
    Alaska Senate Bill 94 (1999)**

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, parent or legal guardian must register if the patient is under 18

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

Alaska Medical Marijuana Card

  • Recreational use is allowed for adults 21 or older

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Alaska

  1. Download and print the Marijuana Application Packet* from the Alaska DHSS website.
  2. Fill out the Application for Medical Marijuana Registry*. The application must be signed by both the patient (or parent) and a witness.
  3. Have a physician licensed in the state of Alaska fill out a Physician’s Statement for Medical Marijuana Registry* Find a marijuana-friendly doctor here(no link).
  4. For minors: fill out the section in the Application for Medical Marijuana Registration* designated for minors.
    • The parent or legal guardian must register as the patient’s primary caregiver (see the section on caregivers below)
  5. Obtain a photocopy of the patient’s Alaska Driver’s License or Alaska State Issued ID
  6. Mail a check or money order for $25 with the appropriate paperwork to:

Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics
Marijuana Registry
P.O. Box 110699
Juneau, AK 99811‐0699

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Alaska

Adults over the age of 21 can legally possess up to 6 marijuana plants, with a maximum of 3 flowering plants. Minors and adults under the age of 21 are not permitted to grow pot, even if they are registered as medical marijuana patients. If a patient is under 18, a parent or legal guardian must register as his/her primary caregiver and produce or procure marijuana for the patient. If the patient is an adult, but not yet over 21, the laws are unclear. Until the state of Alaska passes regulations, we recommend that adult patients under 21 find a primary caregiver to acquire marijuana for them.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Alaska

Please Note: it is no longer required for adults over the age of 21 to register as caregivers if they choose to grow marijuana (see regulations above). Patients over 18 do not need to list a caregiver on their application. However, a patient under the age of 18 MUST list a parent or legal guardian as their primary caregiver. Listing an alternate caregiver is optional.

  1. Download and print the Marijuana Application Packet* from the Alaska DHSS website.
  2. Fill out the Primary Caregiver Application for Medical Marijuana Registry* or Alternate Caregiver Application for Medical Marijuana Registry. A witness signature is required.
  3. Obtain a photocopy of your Alaska Driver’s License or Alaska State Issued ID

Mail a check or money order for $25 with the appropriate paperwork to:

Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics
Marijuana Registry
P.O. Box 110699
Juneau, AK 99811‐0699

How to Renew Your Alaska Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Current medical marijuana patients in Alaska do not need to renew their registration if they are over 21 years of age. For patients under 21, the Application for Medical Marijuana Registry* and Physician’s Statement for Medical Marijuana Registry* must be renewed annually. The renewal fee is $20. Follow the steps listed above under How to Obtain or Renew a Medical Marijuana Card in Alaska, but make sure to check the renewal box in the top right hand corner of the application form. Primary caregivers and alternate caregivers do not need to renew registration.

Alaska Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver Registration is not available if you are:

  • Under 21 years of age
  • Have ever been convicted of a drug-related felony
  • Are currently on probation or parole in any jurisdiction

 

Medical Marijuana cards are available to all patients with a qualifying condition and a completed Physician’s Statement for Medical Marijuana Registry*.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Forms and Resources

  • All forms can be found in the Marijuana Application Packet at the Alaska DPHSS website here.

Alaska

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2015

In January of 2015, the Hawaii Department of Health began issuing medical marijuana cards, called 329 Cards, to qualifying patients. Medical marijuana has been legal in Hawaii since 2000, but recent changes have been made to the original laws. Previously, the medical marijuana program was run by the Hawaii Department of Public Safety. In 2013, House Bill 668 was passed, which transferred control of medical cannabis registration over to the Hawaii Department of Health. Additionally, in July of 2015, Hawaii passed legislation that opens the door for state dispensaries. The laws regarding medical cannabis are new and will not be fully implemented for several months, but a temporary system is in place to assist patients who qualify. Currently, patients can designate a caregiver, but each caregiver is only allowed to have one patient. There are no available state dispensaries at this time, but we hope to see them open in the near future. To keep yourself informed about the ongoing changes to medical pot law, check the Hawaii DOH website here.

In Hawaii, unlawful personal use or possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $1000. Possession of 1 ounce to 1 pound of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 1 year in prison and fines of up to $2000. Possession of any amount over one pound is a felony punishable by up to 5 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000. Commercial promotion or distribution  is a felony punishable by a maximum of 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $50,000. Registered medical marijuana patients can lawfully carry up to four ounces of cannabis total between patient and caregiver. Read HRS 329* for more information.

*Links to full legal documents can be found in our Legal Resources section at the bottom of this page.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    Cachexia
    Severe Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    4 ounces between patient and caregiver

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 7 plants, with no more than 4 ounces of useable marijuana

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes, but n

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    HRS 329-122*
    HB 668 (2013)*
    SB 862 (2014)*
    SB 642 (2015)*
    HB 321 (2015)*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Hawaii

Hawaii residents with qualifying medical conditions are permitted to apply for a 329 Card, or medical marijuana card. Registration is required prior to growing or using marijuana. The state also requires all medical cannabis patients to identify and register the grow site that their medical marijuana will come from. If you are growing your own marijuana, read the section below on home cultivation for more details. The application process for a 329 Card must be completed by your physician. You will fill out the required paperwork and return it to your doctor so that he/she can submit it for approval. The Hawaii DOH is currently working on creating an online application process for medical cannabis patients. Until the system is ready, your physician will complete part of your application online and mail the remaining documents to the state. 329 cards are not valid unless signed by your physician and you must have both your 329 card and photo ID with you if you are carrying marijuana.

  1. Before you can submit an application for a medical marijuana card, your physician must fill out the online application here. If you choose to pay for your application with a credit or debit card, your physician will enter that information at this time. The cost to apply is $38.50.
  2. Your physician must fill out the 329 Physician Certification* form.
  3. You must fill out the 329 Applicant Certification* form.
    • If the patient is a minor or an adult who lacks legal capacity, a parent, guardian or legal custodian must fill out the 329 Minor or Adult Lacking Legal Capacity Certification* form.
    • If you fill out this form, a parent, guardian or legal custodian must also submit a Caregiver Certification*.
    • If the patient is under 10 years old, a birth certificate is acceptable identification. Patients over 10 must have a state issued photo ID to apply.
  4. You or your caregiver must fill out the 329 Grow Site Certification* form. This form is required even if you do not choose a caregiver.
  5. If you are designating a caregiver, your caregiver must fill out the 329 Caregiver Certification* form. (See the section on caregivers below for more information)
  6. Make a copy of your State ID, Driver’s License or passport.
  7. If you chose not to pay for your application with a card, give your physician a cashier’s check or money order for $38.50. Checks should be made out to Hawaii DOH. Personal checks will not be accepted.
  8. Return all signed and completed documents back to your physician. Your physician will mail these forms to the Hawaii DOH. Patients and caregivers are not permitted to submit application forms themselves.
  9. If your application is accepted, the Hawaii DOH will mail your 329 registration card to your physician. Your physician must then sign the back of the card before giving it to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Hawaii

In Hawaii, patients and caregivers are allowed to grow a maximum of 7 plants. The total useable marijuana on these plants cannot amount to more than 4 ounces at any given time. Each patient must designate only one grow site for their marijuana and register that site when they apply for their 329 card. The grow site must belong to either the patient or caregiver; please keep in mind that the address will be printed on your card when you receive it. Hawaii medical marijuana law requires each plant to be labeled with the patient’s registration card number and expiration date.

At this time, Hawaii does not have a state dispensary system in place. In July of 2015 House Bill 321* was passed, which allows for the creation of a dispensary system, however, the bill limits the types of cannabis that can be sold to “oils, capsules, lozenges and pills”. Until Hawaii establishes a more comprehensive program, patients are required to grow marijuana for themselves.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Hawaii

Medical marijuana law in Hawaii makes it clear that each patient can have only one caregiver, and each caregiver can have only one patient. Patients may grow marijuana for themselves, but they are not permitted to grow for other patients. If you are thinking of registering as a caregiver for another patient, you must send in your application as a part of your patient’s paperwork. The cost of your caregiver registration is included in the patient’s application fee, so you do not need to pay. Follow the steps below to receive your 329 card and become a registered caregiver.

  1. Your patient’s physician will need to begin their application. At this time, your patient will have the opportunity to designate a caregiver (you).
  2. Fill out the 329 Caregiver Certification* and the 329 Grow Site Certification*.
  3. Make a copy of your State ID, Driver’s License or US Passport.
  4. Return both forms to your patient or your patient’s physician along with the photocopy of your ID.
  5. Your patient’s doctor will complete the application process. If your application is approved, the doctor will  receive your 329 card in the mail. He/she will sign the card before giving it to you.

How to Renew Your Hawaii Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

Hawaii 329 cards expire after one year. Currently, the Hawaii DOH is creating an online renewal program for medical cannabis patients. Once the system is functional, patients and caregivers will be able to renew their 329 cards online. If you are a registered patient or caregiver, keep your eyes open for news about how to renew your card.

Hawaii Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregivers in Hawaii must be over the age of 18.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Forms and Resources

Hawaii

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2015

On February 26th, 2015, Washington DC joined the four other states that have legalized recreational marijuana. Adults over the age of 21 can now legally possess up to two ounces of cannabis or 6 plants (maximum of 3 flowering). It is still illegal to buy and sell recreational marijuana, or to possess more than two ounces at a time. Medical marijuana patients can still register for the district medical marijuana program, but they do not need to do so unless they want to use district dispensaries. Also, it is important to remember that marijuana is still considered an illegal drug by federal standards. District residents can still be charged with a federal crime for possessing or using marijuana in any of the national parks or federal territories in DC. District law still bans both smoking and consumption of cannabis in any public place and individuals or patients who are high can still be convicted of a DUI. It remains illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to possess cannabis unless they are registered medical marijuana patients. We recommend that patients maintain their registration until lawmakers establish clear boundaries between state and federal law.

  •   QUALIFYING CONDITIONS

    HIV/AIDS
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    Severe/Persistent muscle spasms
    treatments using chemotherapy or radiation
    treatments using azidothymidine or protease inhibitors

    Cachexia/Wasting Syndrome
    Severe and Chronic Pain
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
    Cancer
    Glaucoma
    HIV/AIDS
    Hepatitis C
    ALS
    Crohn’s Disease
    Alzheimer’s Disease
    PTSD

    AIDS
    Anorexia
    Arthiritis
    Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
    Cancer
    Chronic Pain
    Glaucoma
    Migraines
    Severe Nausea
    Seizures
    Persistent Muscle Spasms
    “any other chronic or persistent medical symptom that either substantially limits a person’s ability to conduct one or more of major life activities as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, or if not alleviated, may cause serious harm to the person’s safety, physical, or mental health”

  •   PATIENT POSSESSION LIMITS

    2 ounces or 6 plants (maximum of 3 mature plants)

  •   HOME CULTIVATION

    Yes, up to 6 plants, with a maximum of 3 mature plants

  •   STATE-LICENSED DISPENSARIES ALLOWED

    Yes

  •   MEDICAL MARIJUANA STATUTES

    Initiative 71 (2015)*
    Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Act of 2010*
    Proposed Rulemaking for Medical Marijuana (2013)*
    Medical Marijuana Cultivation Center Amendment Act (2013)*
    Medical Marijuana Supply Shortage Emergency Amendment Act of 2015*
    Medical Marijuana Cultivation Center Exception Emergency Amendment Act of 2015*

    Arizona Medical Marijuana Act-I-04-2010 (Proposition 203)*
    Arizona House Bill 2349 (2012)*
    Arizona Administrative Code- Title 9, Chapter 17*

    Compassionate Use Act (1996)**
    Senate Bill 420**
    Health and Safety Code Section 11362.7-11362.83**

  •   CAREGIVERS

    Yes, parent or legal guardian must register if the patient is under 18

    Yes

    Yes. Caregivers must have “consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety” of a patient to qualify as that patient’s caregiver.

How to Obtain a Medical Marijuana Card in Washington DC

  1. Have your doctor fill out an Electronic Physician Recommendation Form*. They will need to register online so that the Department of health can verify that their license is in good standing.
  2. Download and print the Patient Application Form* or Minor Patient Application Form* (adult patients have the option to fill out and submit this form electronically).
  3. Review the Patient Application Instructions* and Patient Application Checklist*(or Minor Patient Application Checklist*).
  4. Fill out the Patient Application Form* or Minor Patient Application Form*.
    • For Minors: The parent or legal guardian must register as the patient’s caregiver. Follow the instructions for caregivers below and mail both applications together.
  5. Obtain two passport sized photographs of the patient (see the Patient Application Checklist* for requirements).
  6. Make a photocopy of your driver’s license, passport or State/District issued ID. If you are filling out a minor application, make a copy of the parent or guardian’s ID.
  7. Obtain a certified check, money order or cashier’s check for $100 made out to DC Treasurer. Personal checks will not be accepted. You may qualify for a reduced fee of $25. See the Patient Application Checklist* for more details.
  8. Mail all of the documents listed above to:DOH-Medical Marijuana Program
    P.O. Box 37804
    Washington DC, 20013
  9. If your application is accepted, your medical marijuana card will be mailed to you.

*Links to all the required paperwork can be found in our Forms and Resources section at the bottom of this page.

Home Cultivation of Marijuana and State Dispensaries in Washington DC

Prior to February if 2015, Patients and caregivers were not allowed to grow marijuana. All cannabis and cannabis-related products had to be purchased from a licensed district dispensary. However, since the legalization of recreational pot, cultivation is allowed by adults over the age of 21. You are permitted to grow up to 6 plants, with a maximum of 3 flowering plants. Medical marijuana patients still have access to licensed district dispensaries, recreational users do not. If you are a medical marijuana patient, you will be required to choose a primary dispensary in your area. This is the only dispensary you are allowed to purchase marijuana from, unless you fill out a Change of Information Form*. Each patient is allowed to designate one dispensary at a time.

How to Become a Medical Marijuana Caregiver in Washington DC

  1. Print and fill out the Caregiver Application Form*.
    • For Minors: The parent or legal guardian must register as the patient’s caregiver.
  2. Obtain two passport sized photographs of yourself (see the Patient Application Checklist* for requirements).
  3. Make a photocopy of your driver’s license, passport or State/District issued ID.
  4. Obtain a certified check, money order or cashier’s check for $100 made out to DC Treasurer. Personal checks will not be accepted. You may qualify for a reduced fee of $25. See the Caregiver Application Form* for more details.
  5. Mail all of the documents listed above to:DOH-Medical Marijuana Program
    P.O. Box 37804
    Washington DC, 20013
  6. Once you have mailed your application, you must schedule a criminal background check with MorphoTrust (visit their website here, or call 1-877-783-4187 to schedule). You must submit your application before you schedule your criminal background check.
  7. If your application is accepted, your medical marijuana card will be mailed to you.

How to Renew Your Washington DC Medical Marijuana Card or Caregiver Registration

If you choose to renew you medical marijuana card or caregiver card,  simply reapply by following the instructions above. Cards are good for one year or until the expiration date listed.

Washington DC Medical Marijuana Restrictions

Caregiver Registration is not available if you are:

  • Under 18 years old
  • Are currently a caregiver for any other patients
  • Have ever been convicted of a drug-related offense

Washington DC

Status: Active

Law Signed: 2015

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